Reverse Transfer Program Offers Degree Opportunity

Plan allows community college transfers to earn associate's degree while completing coursework at four-year colleges

OXFORD, Miss. – Students who begin their college course work at Mississippi community colleges before transferring to one of the state’s public four-year universities can receive their associate’s degree by simply saying “yes” during the enrollment process. The program, called reverse transfer, began as a pilot at Ole Miss and is now available at all of Mississippi’s institutions of higher learning.

Ole Miss began the pilot in 2012 by collecting five years’ worth of data about students who came to the university from a community college and could potentially benefit from such a program, said Charlotte Fant Pegues, UM assistant provost. The provost’s office collaborated with other campus entities to reach out to approximately 1,600 students. Although the pilot initially included only Northeast Community College, Pegues said she quickly saw the need for expansion.

“Although a student may have come to us from NECC, the student may have actually earned the required credits from a different community college and could therefore receive a degree from that particular institution,” Pegues explained. “We have now been able to engage advisers from all of Mississippi’s community colleges to help make students aware of this program as they transfer out to one of our public universities.”

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CBS News: For Medgar Evers’ widow, husband’s legacy trumps personal bitterness

OXFORD, Miss. – Myrlie Evers-Williams acknowledges it would be easy to remain mired in bitterness and anger, 50 years after a sniper’s bullet made her a widow.

Instead, she’s determined to celebrate the legacy of her first husband, Medgar Evers — a civil rights figure often overshadowed by peers such as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. Read the entire story.

Washington Post: Myrlie Evers-Williams returns to Mississippi as more than a civil rights widow

Oxford, Miss. — Myrlie Evers-Williams moves gingerly about the crowd, slowed by her 80-year-old knees. The University of Mississippi chancellor, who has invited her to speak at commencement exercises, takes her hand to lead her down a flight of stairs. Students, black and white, ask to pose for a photo with her as she makes her way to the stage. Her daughter, always nearby, is holding her purse. She is doted on. Read the entire story.

Medgar Evers 50th Anniversary Commemoration

In partnership with museums, universities, foundations, and national organizations across the country, the Medgar and Myrlie Evers Institute is sponsoring events commemorating the 50th anniversary of Medgar Evers’ assassination, culminating in a series of activities in Washington, D. C., and Jackson, Miss., in June 2013. For a complete list of events, visit http://www.eversinstitute.org/.

Events in Jackson, Miss., June 8-12

  • June 8 – Inaugural Medgar Evers International Day of Justice and Service

www.MEdayofjusticeandservice.org

  • June 9 – Medgar Evers Sunday

Faith leaders all over the world will remember Medgar Evers and celebrate his legacy by sharing a message of unity and faith.

  • June 9 – Liturgy for Racial Reconciliation, 4 p.m.

Commemorating the life and legacy of Medgar Evers, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral

  • June 9 – Medgar Evers Exhibit Grand Opening and Reception, 6 p.m.

Smith Robertson Museum and Cultural Center

  • June 10-11 – Where Medgar Walked: Civil Rights Sites Tours (city-wide)
  • June 10-11 – Civil Rights Film Festival, Davis Planetarium
  • June 11 – Day of Commitment

Youth Congress: Dedicated to the Cause of Freedom, Cabot Lodge Millsaps

  • June 12 – International Day of Remembrance, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Art Garden Celebration on the Green, Mississippi Museum of Art, Music • Art • Food festival • Literacy fair • Reflections and book signings by historians and authors • Sponsor exhibits

  • Service of the Bells, Noon – 12:30 p.m., Memorial and praise in word and song
  • Tribute Gala, 7:30 p.m.

Jackson Convention Complex

For tickets, call 1-800-599-0650.

NEMS Daily Journal: Myrlie Evers-Williams encourages 2013 University of Mississippi graduates

OXFORD – Declaring her belief in their individual and combined power, renowned civil rights activist and author Myrlie Evers-Williams challenged University of Mississippi graduating seniors to become active in making the state, nation and world a better place for all people.

“I believe in you, and I hope you believe in yourselves, too,” Evers-Williams said Saturday as she delivered the main address at the university’s 160th Commencement. “Soar! Not only for yourselves, nor just for the betterment of Mississippi, but for betterment of all mankind. Soar, and be free.”

Clarion-Ledger Blog: Myrlie Evers receives Humanitarian Award from Ole Miss — nearly 60 years after law school turned her husband away

Myrlie Evers-Williams today (May 11) became the first person in a decade honored with a Humanitarian Award by the University of Mississippi — the same institution that turned away her late husband from entering law school.

The widow of slain Mississippi NAACP leader Medgar Evers was surprised with the award after delivering the university’s 160th commencement address this morning to Ole Miss graduates.

The award has only been bestowed twice before. In 2001, Ole Miss honored Jim and Sally Barksdale. Two years later, William and Elise Winter also received the award.

Read more.

Mississippi Press Blog: Myrlie Evers-Williams challenges Ole Miss graduates to ‘soar, and be free’

Declaring her belief in their individual and combined power, renowned civil rights activist and author Myrlie Evers-Williams challenged University of Mississippi graduating seniors to become active in making the state, nation and world a better place for all people.

“I believe in you, and I hope you believe in yourselves, too,” Evers-Williams said today as she delivered the main address at the university’s 160th commencement ceremony. “Soar! Not only for yourselves, nor just for the betterment of Mississippi, but for betterment of all mankind. Soar, and be free.”

Read more.

WTOK: Evers-Williams Addresses Ole Miss Graduates

Civil rights leader Myrlie Evers-Williams has told graduates at the University of Mississippi to “soar, and be free.”

She spoke Saturday during a commencement ceremony on the university’s main campus in Oxford.

Read the full story.

Sun Herald: Evers-Williams to Ole Miss graduates: ‘Soar, and be free’

OXFORD — Civil rights leader Myrlie Evers-Williams told graduates at the University of Mississippi on Saturday they have the power “to do what is right, to do what is just” and make the world a better place.

“I believe in you, and I hope you believe in yourselves, too,” Evers-Williams said during a commencement ceremony on the university’s main campus in Oxford. “Soar! Not only for yourselves, nor just for the betterment of Mississippi, but for betterment of all mankind. Soar, and be free.”

Myrlie Evers-Williams’ Commencement Address Full of Memorable Moments

OXFORD, Miss. – Here are some memorable excerpts from Myrlie Evers-Williams commencement address at the University of Mississippi:

“As the sun began to come out, it reminded me of one word: belief. Work toward that belief and it will become a reality.”

“One other word that speaks to who and what you are and what you can become: power. You have the power within you. Do you realize just how powerful you are as individuals and as a group? You can bear and make change in this state, in the nation and in the world.”

“You have the power to do what is right, to do what is just. I ask you, ‘What rests in your hearts?’”

“Being able to look beyond your role at this campus and find your role in this world will not only impact you, but your states, nation and the world. I hope you realize and take seriously the role you will play.”

“I have a long relationship with this university. It changed my life very early as a young woman. I was largely unaware of the ills of society at that time. I thought my husband was out of his mind to seek a law degree from here. ‘It will never happen,’ I said to him.” He told me, ‘It will happen – if not for me, then for someone else who will come after me.’ We have been linked together for 50 years.”

“I want to see Mississippi rise from the very bottom to the very top. Educationally, this place is at the top. Emotionally, let’s be honest: that’s still being worked out.”

“I believe in you, in Mississippi, in America. May we find peaceful dialogue to deal with issues – not walk away from each other. Let’s come together where we can all be proud and all know we have paved the way for others with positive images of equality for all.”

“I have no regrets for what has happened, except one (referring to Medgar Evers’ assassination). That single event changed all our lives. Not just mine or my children’s, but many.”

“Once you graduate from here, you are truly on your own, Make your own decisions and live by them. Medgar Evers did, even when his family members didn’t initially believe in his vision.”

“This proud university has evolved for 165 years. I believe this class, more than any other before it, will have the opportunity to make everything good. I prefer to believe in the good of all humankind; that there are more people of good will than there are who do not feel that way.”

“Education is no longer a pathway to success; it is a prerequisite. Never has a college degree been more important – or more expensive.”

“Graduation is a time for us to reflect on the rich history of this university, and celebrate the excellence of an Ole Miss education.”

“You are more powerful than you think you are. Use that power for the betterment of all people. Be like the eagle. Fly high above the clouds of adversity. Use the storms to lift you higher and rise to greater heights.”

“Will you be an eagle or will you just be a bird hiding from the storm and waiting for it to be over? I truly hope you’ll use your strength as eagles to pass on the good works, good deeds this society needs. Dream the impossible. Don’t be intimidated by anything. Don’t let difficulties tie your mind or break your spirit. You have a bright future. Be strong.”

“We are all human beings. We are all children of God or whatever deity you wish to call upon. I believe in you, I hope you believe in yourselves, too. Not only for yourself, nor for the betterment of Mississippi but for all mankind. Soar! Soar . . . and be free!”

“Mississippi is considered to be the poorest state in the nation. As we push forward in education and human relations, I believe we will see very positive change in the near future. I’m back here to be a part of that change.”

“The state has made great progress, but let’s face it: we still have so much further to go.”

“Medgar did not want to die, but he believed so fully in what he stood for that he had to do it. Medgar’s death broke down the barrier of fear, yet we still see vestiges of racism. You don’t solve emotional feelings surrounding race in a century – probably not even in two centuries. It’s an evolving thing. We have to keep moving forward.”