UM Museum Readies Major Exhibition Honoring Kate Freeman Clark

Curators hope to broaden awareness of painter's works and raise support for conservation

University Museum workers hang a portrait for the ‘Lasting Impressions: Restoring Kate Freeman Clark’ exhibit, set to open March 28. Photo by Robert Jordan/Ole Miss Communications

OXFORD, Miss. – The largest exhibit in more than two decades featuring works by acclaimed Mississippi painter Kate Freeman Clark is set to debut March 28 at the University of Mississippi Museum.

“Lasting Impressions: Restoring Kate Freeman Clark” includes more than 70 paintings from the Kate Freeman Clark Art Gallery and several artifacts from the Marshall County Historical Museum to illustrate different times and aspects of the artist’s life.

The exhibition was developed by Guest Curators James G. Thomas Jr., associate director for publications at the university’s Center for the Study of Southern Culture, and Annette Trefzer, UM associate professor of English.

“The fact that there was an accomplished and prolific female artist in our neighborhood whose name I had never heard before was the magnet that drew me first to the Holly Springs museum,” said Trefzer, also owner of Bozarts Gallery in Water Valley.

“And visiting there, I was overwhelmed by the quality and depth of her work: hundreds of canvases of landscapes, portraits and still lifes reside in the little museum. What a treasure and what a story!”

The exhibition is a major event for the University Museum and for art lovers across north Mississippi, said Robert Saarnio, museum director.

“The University Museum is honored and thrilled to have developed this major exhibition of the work of Kate Freeman Clark, in partnership with our guest curators, the Holly Springs lending institutions and our donors who so graciously provided the required funding,” Saarnio said.

“The compelling story of this exceptional artist and the beauty of her work will captivate audiences and inspire a renewed appreciation for one of Mississippi’s artistic treasures.”

A colorful garden scene from the ‘Lasting Impressions: Restoring Kate Freeman Clark’ exhibit, set to open March 28 at the University Museum. Photo by Robert Jordan/Ole Miss Communications

A Holly Springs native, Clark spent many years in New York City, where she studied under teacher, mentor and well-known American impressionist William Merritt Chase. She produced hundreds of paintings and had major exhibits at the Boston Art Club, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Corcoran Gallery, Carnegie Institute, New York School of Art, National Academy of Design and the Society of American Artists.

After 27 years of painting and following the deaths of Chase and her mother and grandmother, Clark stored her entire collection in a New York City warehouse in 1923 and returned to Holly Springs, where she remained until her death in 1957. She left her collection and estate to the city.

“I was first drawn to Kate Freeman Clark’s fascinating life story, and as I examined her vast body of work, she became all the more intriguing to me,” Thomas said. “How could a person with such great talent and obvious drive to create, and who had achieved a not inconsiderable measure of success, suddenly abandon her passion?”

An opening reception is set for 6 p.m. March 28 in conjunction with the Oxford Arts Crawl. The city’s double-decker busses will stop at the museum every 20 minutes for guest convenience. The event is free and open to the public.

A landscape from the ‘Lasting Impressions: Restoring Kate Freeman Clark’ exhibit, set to open March 28 at the University Museum. Photo by Robert Jordan/Ole Miss Communications

“The main concept of our show is to highlight her work as that of a woman artist,” Trefzer said. “We also want to show the variety of work in terms of styles, themes and media that she created as a student. We call the show ‘Lasting Impressions’ because we want the viewer to confront her ‘impressions’ of the world around her, a domestic life largely dominated by her mother and grandmother, and her love of the landscapes, both cultivated and natural, that she painted.”

Only a fraction of Clark’s paintings have been exhibited for many years, so the exhibit represents a rare opportunity for art lovers to view the works, Thomas said.

Both Thomas and Trefzer expressed special thanks to Walter Webb, director of the gallery in Holly Springs, for his assistance in developing the exhibit. They also hope the showing will boost support for continued conservation of the artist’s works, Trefzer said.

“These canvases have lasted more than 120 years, and we hope that with ongoing restoration efforts, more of them will be preserved for the future,” she said. “This is why we are also showing unrestored work. We want to make the public aware of this woman’s tremendously accomplished work so worth preserving and of her unique story that should be included in books of art history.”

A panel discussion on “The Art of Kate Freeman Clark” is slated for 1:30 p.m. March 30 at the museum, as part of the Oxford Conference for the Book. A reception will follow the discussion.

Panelists include writer, editor and scholar Carolyn Brown, who published award-winning biographies of Eudora Welty and Margaret Walker, as well as “The Artist’s Sketch: A Biography of Painter Kate Freeman Clark” (University Press of Mississippi, 2017). She will sign copies of the book at the reception.

Other panelists are Thomas, Trefzer and Beth Batton, an art historian and executive director of The Oaks House Museum in Jackson.

Funding for the exhibition was provided by Lester and Susan Fant III, Tim and Lisa Liddy, David B. Person, the Bank of Holly Springs, Ellis Stubbs State Farm Insurance, First State Bank and Tyson Drugs Inc.

The museum, at Fifth Street and University Avenue, is open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Admission is free. For more information, visit http://museum.olemiss.edu/.

Asian Art Expert to Discuss Significance of UM Museum Photo Exhibit

Angela Howard to lecture Tuesday on Dunhuang exhibit

The inside of a cave in Dunhuang, China, displays intricate paintings and a Buddha statue. Photo courtesy Angela Howard

OXFORD, Miss. – An expert on the Buddhist art of China will discuss what we can learn about the evolution of religion and culture of Central Asia through photographs of the intricate cave paintings of Dunhuang, China, during a lecture Tuesday (March 21) at the University of Mississippi Museum.

Angela Howard, professor of Asian art at Rutgers University, will speak at 5 p.m. in the museum’s Speaker’s Gallery. The event, held in conjunction with the museum’s “Dunhuang through the Lens of James and Lucy Lo,” is free and open to the public.

“The University Museum is very pleased to offer this lecture by such a distinguished international scholar,” said Robert Saarnio, the museum’s director. “Professor Howard’s teaching spans Chinese and Japanese art and has focused primarily on the development of Buddhist art in China, making her a perfect speaker to accompany this exceptional Silk Road photography exhibition.”

The exhibit features photographs taken of the caves in the 1940s by the Los. The nearly 500 caves are in the northwestern area of China, along the ancient Silk Road, and are a major Buddhist pilgrimage site. Each one features intricately painted artwork, dating to between the fourth and 14th centuries.

Joshua Howard, UM Croft associate professor of history and international studies and Angela Howard’s son, approached the museum staff about partnering for this event in conjunction with the exhibit of the Los’ photographs.

“Dr. Angela Howard is an authority on the Buddhist art of China and Central Asia, and she happens to be my mother,” Joshua Howard said. “When the University Museum was able to borrow the photographic exhibit on Dunhuang caves, which was facilitated by my mother’s contacts at Princeton University, I reached out to my mother to present a talk.

“Dunhuang is very much on her mind these days as she’ll also be teaching an on-site workshop there this summer sponsored by the Woodenfish Foundation.”

Angela Howard specializes in the Buddhist art of China and Central Asia and has studied the culture and area extensively. She said she plans to discuss “how the photos of the Dunhuang caves’ architecture and paintings enable us to reconstruct the type of Buddhism practiced at Dunhuang, a Chinese transformation of Indian and Central Asian traditions.”

The “Dunhuang through the Lens of James and Lucy Lo” exhibit is on display through April 29.

The museum, at the corner of University Avenue and Fifth Street, is open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Admission is free. For more information about museum exhibits and events, visit http://museum.olemiss.edu/.

Saturday Collaborations Unlock Possibilities for Marks Students

Weekend program brings middle schoolers to UM campus for tutoring, mentoring and fun

Ole Miss student-athletes mentor a group of fifth- to eighth-grade students from Quitman County Middle School during the weekend sessions on the UM campus.

OXFORD, Miss. – Most students regard Saturday school with dread and contempt, but a group of middle schoolers from the Delta community of Marks looks forward to its weekend tutoring sessions at the University of Mississippi.  For some of these students, the sessions have become life-changing.

For six Saturdays between February and April, 53 students from Quitman County Middle School travel nearly an hour by school bus from Marks to the Ole Miss campus for a day of tutoring and fun activities.

Bryce Warden, the AmeriCorps VISTA working in the UM School of Education, coordinated the initiative after attending a meeting last fall about the Marks Project, a 501c(3) organization dedicated to restoring the Marks community. He previously had helped launch a program that pairs college students with North Panola High School seniors to help them apply for college.

“I saw the benefit of those interactions, where students – many of them potential first-generation students – could find out what college life was really like and I was eager to create such an environment for the kids from Marks,” Warden said. “Now, these middle school students get to receive tutoring on a college campus, which they may have never seen.”

The students, ranging from fifth to eighth grades, were chosen for the program based on test scores and their need for additional learning assistance.

In the morning, 19 Ole Miss students from the Mississippi Excellence in Teaching Program work with the students for two hours in reading, language and math.

Kendall Kern, a freshman in the METP program from Lewisburg, tutors the students in language arts. She was eager to become involved in the program when she heard about it.

“I went down to Marks and really got to see the school and realized I needed to give back,” she said. “If I can do anything for them and provide a positive impact, that’s going to mean so much.”

Kern added that she’s learned from the experience, as well.

“Getting to have our own classroom time with them has really helped me with my teaching experience,” she said. “We’re able to teach interactive lessons and experiment with different teaching methods. I love all the amazing opportunities that METP and the School of Education provide us with.”

Although the educational component is the core of the program, Warden realized that the students needed activity time, too. He sought additional partnerships with Ole Miss Campus Recreation and the university’s Department of Intercollegiate Athletics for afternoon activities.

Each group is providing programming for three Saturdays, including physical activities in the Turner Center, student-athlete mentorship and a tour of the Field Level Club at Vaught-Hemingway Stadium and the Manning Center.

Middle school students from Quitman County visit the UM campus as part of a spring program that provides academic tutoring and activities with student-athletes and Ole Miss Campus Recreation.

The Freeze Foundation, a charitable organization started by football Coach Hugh Freeze, has acted as liaison between the School of Education and the athletics department to provide student-athlete mentorships for the group. Alice Blackmon, the foundation’s executive director, serves as Marks Project co-chair of the tutoring and mentoring program.

After Freeze learned about the economic, educational and community issues in the Mississippi Delta, he wanted to become involved, Blackmon said.

“These issues weighed heavily on his heart,” she said. “He wanted to invest time in serving the children through building relationships and encouraging them in hopes of making a positive impact.

“We have served internationally in Haiti and Africa, but he was really passionate about shining a light into the communities that are right in our backyard in Mississippi.”

The program has been a double-sided ministry, also making a positive impact on the athletes, she added.

The Marks Project is an umbrella organization of all the volunteers within the Marks community. Jaby Denton, co-founder of the project with Mitch Campbell of Taylor, is working to revitalize the largest town in Quitman County by providing educational and recreational opportunities.

Denton, who owns a farm in Quitman County, moved back to the community from Oxford in 2015. He started a youth group that year and realized many students were behind academically.

“Marks was a town where a wagon pulled by mules led the Poor People’s Campaign in D.C.,” Denton said. “It was the epicenter of the civil rights movement.

“Dr. (Martin Luther) King visited Marks, saw extensive poverty and realized something had to be done. 2018 is the 50th anniversary of the mule train, and we are doing everything we can to fulfill Dr. King’s dream to provide opportunities for residents and students.”

Cortez Moss, an Ole Miss alumnus and principal of Quitman County Middle School, identified educational needs and approached the Marks Project for assistance in recruiting teachers and tutoring students.

When Moss became principal in August, he recognized that students at the school, which received an “F” rating last year, lacked exposure and academic support, he said.

“Our school’s motto is ‘Our Education is Freedom,’ and I knew I needed to give them liberating experiencing that would make our vision come true for scholars and families,” Moss said. “My original intent was for academic support; however, in the planning process I realized that my scholars needed exposure.

“This truth was evidenced one Saturday (at UM) when one of the scholars did not recognize an elevator and found joy in just being able to ride an elevator.”

After only a few trips to the Ole Miss campus, Moss has seen improvement in his students.

“We’ve seen a lot of success with our scholars – socially, emotionally and academically,” he said. “Many of our scholars come back from the Saturday experience seeing Ole Miss as an opportunity. Ole Miss and college is now their goal. Many of them feel empowered by the experience.”

Spring Honors Convocation Features Evening of Music and Cinema

Event brings acclaimed film artists to UM

Animator Brent Green (left) performs with musicians in a production of ‘Live Cinema.’ Submitted photo

OXFORD, Miss. – This year’s Spring Convocation for the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College will bring a live cinematic experience featuring acclaimed artists to the University of Mississippi.

Titled “Live Cinema,” the event features a series of short films along with live narration and music. It includes Oscar-nominated filmmaker Sam Green; acclaimed animator Brent Green; Dan Nuxoll, artistic director of New York City’s Rooftop Films; and Bruce Levingston, the university’s Chancellor’s Artist-in-Residence. 

The performance is set for 7 p.m. March 8 at the Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts. The free event is open to the public. 

“We are so thrilled to have these renowned artists join us for a wonderful evening of cinema and music,” said Douglass Sullivan-Gonzalez, dean of the Honors College. “Bruce Levingston has assembled an incredible team of gifted artists for our SMBHC Spring Convocation.

“This performance will cast an imaginative light on many of the emotions just below the surface of our day-to-day lives. We are grateful to these extraordinary artists for this opportunity to explore fundamental questions through the arts.”

For “Live Cinema,” Sam Green has created what is known as a “live documentary,” where a video clip and photos are narrated live by him and accompanied by musical performances. 

“Sam Green and Brent Green, though not related, are both known for their unique performances that combine cinema, musical accompaniment and live narration,” Levingston said. “These two celebrated and incredibly innovative artists tell stories about families, rural America, the woman who sewed a spacesuit for the first dog sent into space, music legend Louis Armstrong and even the last person listed in the San Francisco phone book.”

This special collaboration also features live performances by musicians Brendan Canty, James Canty, Becky Foon and Kate Ryan, along with Levingston, in conjunction with cinematic shorts. 

“It is so elastic and so sensitive,” Sam Green said in an interview with The Observer. “If you make a movie, a traditional movie – and I’ve made a lot of them – you put it out in the world and it is done.

“The world changes and your movie doesn’t, and suddenly it just doesn’t work in the same way that it did. I like doing it this way because it is very nimble. It is a sensitive and organic kind of work.”

‘Live Cinema’ has been performed at theaters and halls across the country, including this 2016 show at the University of California at San Diego for its ArtPower Event. Photo by Alex Matthews/Qualcomm Institute/UC San Diego

Sam Green said his performances have been well-received and he feeds off the energy from the crowd, which doesn’t often happen for filmmakers. After debuting his style in 2010, he booked about 50 shows over the next two years. 

In an interview with The New York Times, Green said he discovered the live cinema style accidentally. While editing a documentary, he realized he needed more explanation for visuals. He wanted to avoid using on-camera interview clips, so a friend suggested showing it to an audience and narrating it. 

His collaborations with Brent Green and other artists have been met with tremendous critical success. 

Sam Green said he and his colleagues are looking forward to coming to Oxford for the first time and exploring the literary, musical and historical haunts of the town’s illustrious past, particularly a visit to William Faulkner’s home, Rowan Oak. 

Graduate Student Council Hosting Annual Research Symposium Thursday

Nearly 60 students slated to present projects

The Graduate Student Council is hosting its seventh annual research symposium Thursday at the Inn at Ole Miss. Photo by Robert Jordan/Ole Miss Communications

OXFORD, Miss. – The Graduate Student Council at the University of Mississippi is hosting its seventh annual research symposium from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday (March 2) at the Inn at Ole Miss.

The symposium acts as a mini-conference, allowing graduate students to discuss their research through podium and poster presentations in the categories of social sciences, education, business, accounting, physical and life sciences, arts, humanities, journalism, mathematics, computer science and engineering.

“Events like this are very important for the professional development of graduate students,” said Christy Wyandt, interim dean of the Graduate School. “It gives them an opportunity to practice presenting, to network with faculty and students outside their departments, and to receive constructive advice about their research from peers and faculty.”

The 59 students participating in podium and poster presentations will be competing for $3,000 in academic conference travel awards, co-sponsored by the GSC and the Graduate School, given to the first- and second-place winners in each category. Faculty members and postdoctoral researchers will judge presentations based on content, organization and delivery.

“By presenting, the student also gets the experience of having to explain their research, methodology and results,” said Alexandros Vasios Sivvopoulos, GSC president. “We often have a very clear idea of what a project looks like in our own mind, but explaining it to someone that does not know as much is a whole different story.”

Winners will be announced early next week.

“In February 2016, our university was included in the elite group of R1: Doctoral Universities, and I believe research carried out by our graduate students is an important component and driver of this success,” said Yelda Serinagaoglu, director of academic and professional development for the GSC.

“Events such as ours give students an opportunity to share their research with the university community, sharpen their presentation skills, get feedback from their peers and the faculty, and network. It’s also a day away from the laboratories or classrooms to socialize with each other.”

Isom Center to Host Sarah Talks Series

Discussions highlight UM scholars and community members

OXFORD, Miss. – The Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies at the University of Mississippi will host a series of informal conversations titled “Sarah Talks” throughout March.

The first talk, titled “Women Creating Community through Food: Intersectionality and Entrepreneurship,” is set for 4 p.m. Wednesday (March 1) in Lamar Hall, Room 320. Joester Brassell of Mama Joe’s Country Cooking, Carla Rego of Lusa Bakery and Cafe, and Dixie Grimes of Dixie Belle Cafe (at the B.T.C. Old Fashioned Grocery in Water Valley) will lead the discussion, which is free and open to the public.

“We wanted to establish a lecture series, like Ted Talks, that highlights UM scholars, local members of the community, Mississippi entrepreneurs, artists and social justice advocates who are doing groundbreaking work in gender and sexuality,” said Jaime Harker, Isom Center director. “Women’s History Month seemed like an ideal time to launch Sarah Talks.”

On March 8, Oxford participants in the Women’s March on Washington will discuss their experience at the Powerhouse Community Arts Center. Panelists for the 6 p.m. session include Cristen Hemmins, Jennifer Mizenko, Merrill Nordstrom, Laura Antonow, Alice Ricks, Ellis Starkey, Valentine Payne and Afton Thomas.

On March 22, UM scholars will discuss a cross-disciplinary program studying student attitudes toward gender and sexuality and how they change over time. Harker will join biology professor Lainy Day, psychology professor Kate Kellum and graduate student Yash Bhambhani for a panel discussion at 4 p.m. in Lamar Hall, Room 320.

“We’re very excited about the new series,” said Theresa Starkey, the center’s associate director. “These talks will be recorded, and our goal is turn these into podcasts as part of an online resource library for people to access from our website.”

For more information about Sarah Talks and the Isom Center, go to http://sarahisomcenter.org/.

Chinese Flagship Program to Present Teaching Success in San Francisco

UM program uses technology to help students improve overall reading, writing and listening skills

Henrietta Yang, co-director of the UM Chinese Flagship Program, is among those presenting classroom technologies in San Francisco in March. Photo by Nathan Latil/Ole Miss Communications

OXFORD, Miss. – Representatives of the University of Mississippi’s Chinese Language Flagship Program will travel to San Francisco March 9-10 to participate in a workshop hosted by the Language Flagship Technology Innovation Center at the University of Hawaii.

Language programs from across the country will work together to identify best practices for technology integration and give priority to the effective use of blended learning, the feasibility of extending practice across languages and the likelihood of adoption by students and other instructors.

UM Chinese Language Flagship Program co-director Henrietta Yang, flagship instructor Rongrong Hao and flagship capstone-bound student Brendan Ryan have been invited to present “A Flipped Course through Blackboard Discussion Board.”

Yang said one of the most successful practices she has implemented involving technology includes posting video resources and reading materials to the Blackboard discussion board, allowing students to report what they’ve learned and discuss the video and supplemented articles.

“Since students learn at different rates and have diverse learning styles, technologies play an important role in helping to enhance language learning and to differentiate instruction, as well as to increase learning motivation,” Yang said. “In this type of classroom setting, time is allotted less to directly teaching the material and more toward finessing the skills students have discovered on their own prior to class.”

Using using this method, students have improved their overall reading, writing and listening skills outside of class, allowing them to use the target language as much as possible to communicate in the classroom, Yang said.

“Every student made significant progress after one semester’s training,” she said. “Students have commented that this kind of learning not only provides a tremendous sense of accomplishment, but also provides great fun.”

The Tech Center will provide financial support for all Ole Miss participants, including a student travel stipend.

Students Downloading LiveSafe App Can Win Cool Prizes

UM giving away an iPad, Starbucks card and a day in a golf cart to promote mobile safety platform

Between now and Feb. 24, students can download the LiveSafe app and enter to win a free iPad by uploading a selfie with a UPD officer or by taking a photo of a UPD vehicle.

OXFORD, Miss. – The University of Mississippi is giving away a golf cart for a day, a free iPad and a $50 Starbucks gift card to three lucky students who download LiveSafe, the new mobile safety communications platform for students, faculty and staff.

LiveSafe serves as a tool for real-time security communication and is available for free download for iOS in the App Store and for Android on Google Play.

Students can enter the contest by selecting “iPad Contest” under the Report Tips icon in the app and uploading either a selfie with a University Police officer or by taking a photo of a UPD vehicle on campus. Winners will be announced March 3. Students must download the app and sign up with their Ole Miss email address to enter.

“We strongly encourage students, faculty and staff to download the LiveSafe app so this personal safety tool is readily available,” said Mindy Sutton Noss, assistant vice chancellor for student affairs and dean of students. “Additionally, the app links to the UMatter website and UMSafe, which provide additional resources for the campus community to help their fellow Rebels in need.

“It’s important to utilize these resources and report incidents so we can support one another and help keep the Ole Miss campus safe.”

LiveSafe allows users to report non-emergency tips, including threats, disturbances, assaults, theft, stalking, suspicious activity, drug and alcohol abuse and traffic and parking issues. They can include a photo, video or audio clip when submitting a tip, which can be anonymous. UM safety officials will respond from the appropriate department based on the tip type.

Students can also virtually walk their friends and family members home using the SafeWalk feature. This function uses GPS-enabled location technology to track a person via their mobile device until he or she safely arrives at the destination.

Full instructions are available at http://olemiss.edu/livesafe/.

Other Ole Miss safety resources are available through the sidebar of the app. Students can reach the UMatter website, which allows individuals to access support services for a variety of issues, report bias and hate incidents, and share information regarding campus community members for whom they’re concerned. UMSafe also can be accessed from the app to report issues of sexual assault.

To view all available resources, visit http://umatter.olemiss.edu/.

UM launched the LiveSafe app, which is used on more than 130 college campuses, in November.

“As a member of the team that launched the LiveSafe app, I appreciate that the University of Mississippi is so committed to the safety of our students, faculty and staff, and alumni and guests on and around campus,” said Chasity Galloway, a software developer at UM.

“As a parent, it gives me peace of mind that my daughter will be able to use the app to help keep her safe while she is a student. If at any time she feels unsafe, she has the ability to easily call or text University Police and her location will be available to them. Also, if she chooses, I can virtually watch her reach her destination with the SafeWalk feature of the app from anywhere I am.”

The university also uses the app to send RebAlerts and safety information to the campus community.

History Professor Awarded Prestigious NEH Fellowship

Jarod Roll among nation's top scholars chosen for distinction

History professor Jarod Roll has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship. Photo by Kevin Bain/Ole Miss Communications

OXFORD, Miss. – Jarod Roll, associate professor of history at the University of Mississippi, has been awarded a coveted fellowship by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The yearlong fellowship allows scholars in the humanities to focus solely on their research or writing. Of the 1,298 scholars who applied for the 2017 fellowship, only 86 – less than 7 percent – were chosen for the award. Roll, a highly regarded historian of modern America with a focus on labor in U.S. history, joined the faculty in the Arch Dalrymple III Department of History in 2014.

He plans to use his fellowship, which begins in August, to complete a book project, tentatively titled “American Metal Miners and the Lure of Capitalism 1850-1950.” Roll is exploring the history of the white working-class anti-unionism and conservatism movements in the Tri-State Mining District of Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma, a region that was national leader in the production of zinc and lead.

“Unlike miners elsewhere in the United States, the Tri-State miners resisted unionization and government reforms for over a century,” he said. “I am particularly interested in how their ideas about capitalism, as well as ethnicity and gender, influenced these views.

“Scholars in my field of labor history have not given much attention to workers who opposed unions, particularly over an extended period. My research fills that gap. It’s important, I think, to understand that white working-class conservatism is not a recent development, as some commentators would have it, but rather a subject with a deep history that we can trace back into the middle of the 19th century.”

“We are very proud of Dr. Roll’s achievement and what it represents for the university’s legacy of academic excellence,” Chancellor Jeffrey Vitter said. “This fellowship is one of the most coveted and competitive awards in the humanities, and Dr. Roll’s selection by the NEH is further evidence of his standing as one of the top humanities researchers in the country.”

The honor also is important because of the role humanities play in understanding and applying arts and sciences in today’s world, said Lee Cohen, dean of the UM College of Liberal Arts

“Research in the humanities helps us not only to contextualize development in the sciences, innovations in technology and advances in medicine, it offers us an opportunity to recognize that the work being done on campus by our faculty has a broad reach, beyond the laboratory, beyond the studies and beyond the classroom,” Cohen said.

“This work influences how we understand ourselves in very real, very tangible ways that impact our everyday lives. Dr. Roll being chosen for this well-regarded NEH fellowship indicates that his work is being recognized at the highest level, which is consistent with an R1 institution.”

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities by funding selected peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation.

“NEH provides support for projects across America that preserve our heritage, promote scholarly discoveries and make the best of America’s humanities ideas available to all Americans,” said William D. Adams, NEH chairman. “We are proud to announce this latest group of grantees who, through their projects and research, will bring valuable lessons of history and culture to Americans.”

Roll has previously authored two books “Spirit of Rebellion: Labor and Religion in the New Cotton South” (University of Illinois Press, 2010) and “The Gospel of the Working Class: Labor’s Southern Prophets in New Deal America” (University of Illinois Press, 2011).

UM Graduate School to Host Expo

Event to showcase more than 100 programs of study

Photo by Robert Jordan/Ole Miss Communications

OXFORD, Miss. – The University of Mississippi Graduate School is preparing for its first-ever expo showcasing the possibilities for graduate education spanning a wide range of programs and UM campuses.

The expo is set for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday (Feb. 15) at the Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts.

Designed to showcase more than 100 graduate programs of study, the event will be structured similar to a career fair. Representatives from more than 60 master’s programs, 40 doctoral programs and five specialist programs will be on hand to answer questions about areas of study, admissions and funding.

“We encourage all students to attend this event to get answers to any questions they may have concerning graduate school,” said Brenteria Travis, manager of graduate admissions. “We hope that this event will ignite an interest and erase any apprehension students may have about graduate education.”

Representatives from the School of Law and UM Medical Center also will be in attendance to talk to students about their programs. Other attendees include faculty and staff members from Ole Miss organizations with information regarding funding and research opportunities.

“We are excited to be hosting this event that aims at encouraging our current students and alumni to consider attending graduate school here in one of our esteemed programs at the University of Mississippi,” said Christy Wyandt, professor of pharmaceutics and interim dean of the Graduate School.

All undergraduate, graduate and former students are invited to attend.