Author David Brooks Encourages Students to Find Their Passion

New York Times columnist delivered the SMBHC Fall Convocation address

New York Times columnist and acclaimed author David Brooks encouraged students to explore and find what they are passionate about while in college. Brooks spoke at the recent Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College Fall Convocation.

Guyton Drive Closed to Through Traffic

The three-way stop sign at Guyton Drive and Fraternity Row has moved to Fraternity Row and West Road. Guyton Drive no longer connects to Fraternity Row. New stop signs have been installed at Rebel Drive and Fraternity Row and at the four-way stop at Rebel Drive and the north entrance to Guyton Drive, including the rerouted road going to the back of Kinard Hall.

Dept. of Health and Exercise Sciences Hosts Special Olympics Basketball Tournament

The Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management and the North Mississippi Regional Center teamed up to host a Special Olympics basketball event at the Turner Center. Ole Miss student volunteers helped make the tourney a success.

Ole Miss Food Bank Open Over Holidays

Recognizing the holiday season can be tough time for some people, the UM Food Bank will have volunteers on hand throughout the holiday break to serve Ole Miss students or employees in need.

Started in 2012, the UM Food Bank is open to any Ole Miss student or employee regardless of their financial income. Anyone in need is encouraged to take advantage of the resource, particularly during a time when most campus resources are unavailable.

The UM Food Bank is supported by donations from the community. If you are interested in donating canned goods, hygiene products or other monetary gifts find out more at: www.umfoundation.com/makeagift/.
For more information about the Food Bank visit: http://dos.orgsync.com/org/umfoodbank/home.

Mississippi Teacher Corps Helps Transform a School Culture

Video: North Panola High School receives B grade

FROM NEARLY FAILING TO A ‘B’ SCHOOL IN JUST FOUR YEARS:

  • A program at Ole Miss has helped a struggling Mississippi school district dramatically improve the quality and rigor of its academic programs.
  • In 2009, North Panola School District ranked among the worst in the state, receiving a nearly failing mark. Today, the school has achieved a B rating from the state and has come out of state conservatorship.
  • More than one-third of North Panola’s teachers are current or former members of the university’s Mississippi Teacher Corps program, including three of the school’s instructional coaches in English, science and social studies.
  • Since May 2010, the graduate rate has risen from 49 percent to 72 percent.
  • In subjects such as Algebra I and U.S. History, students’ test scores surpass state averages and they’re not far behind state averages in areas such as English II and Biology I.
  • Last year, North Panola graduates received college scholarships valued at more than $2.2 million, up dramatically from $200,000 in 2010.
  • An alternate route program, the Teacher Corps is a two-year commitment that culminates in a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from UM. Acceptance into the program is highly competitive and includes a full-time teaching job at a critical needs school and full tuition to UM.
  • For the last two years, the Mississippi Teacher Corps program has placed record groups of 32 new teachers into schools throughout Mississippi. To date, the program has trained more than 600 teachers, most of whom are still involved in education across the nation.

Easy and Healthy Snacks for Children

Ole Miss Food Nutrition expert shares some easy ideas for healthy snacks

Hospitality and Nutrition Management associate professor Laurel Lambert offers ideas for healthy snacks for children.

NFSMI: 25 Years of Child Nutrition

Celebrating its 25th year of service in child nutrition, the National Food Service Management Institute is the only federally-funded national center dedicated to applied research, education and training for child nutrition programs.

In this video, Dr. Katie Wilson, executive director at NFSMI, explains how the Institute has changed but still maintains its goal of providing healthy food options to children across the country.

The Institute was established by Congress in the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 1989 and is funded by a grant administered through the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). The Institute’s state-of-the-art facility was dedicated on March 23, 2001 and designated the R. Gerald Turner building on February 16, 2007. It houses a first class training lab, an auditorium designed for distance learning and teleconferences, and the Child Nutrition Archives.

 

Video: NASA Space Launch System Explained

Program promises possibilities for missions to Mars and interstellar travel

NASA’s Todd May, the program manager for the Space Launch System, recently sat down with Ole Miss engineering students to talk about missions to Mars and interstellar travel.

Happy Halloween

Students from the Willie Price Lab School went trick-or-treating at the Lyceum this week

Captain America, Elsa, Anna and a cast of princesses, comic heroes and more made a trip to the Lyceum this week to gather Halloween goodies.

Chancellor Discusses New Science Building

The facility will be a significant addition to “Science Row” along the section between University Avenue and All American Drive.

The University of Mississippi’s reputation for strong teaching and research in the sciences will be bolstered by the addition of a new science building, thanks to a $20 million lead gift from the Gertrude C. Ford Foundation of Jackson.

The facility will be a significant addition to “Science Row” along the section between University Avenue and All American Drive. It comes on the heels of the construction of the Thad Cochran Research Center Phase II – an addition of more than 96,000 square feet that is described as the most technically sophisticated research building in the Southeast – and an expansion of Coulter Hall, adding almost 36,000 square feet.

The classroom space and technological advances offered by another science building will be critical to serve the continuing enrollment growth, UM leaders say. The fall semester opened with 23,096 students on all campuses, the largest enrollment in the state, leading The Chronicle of Higher Education to name UM among the nation’s fastest-growing colleges in its Almanac of Higher Education 2014.

Read the full release.