Jay Watson to Deliver Annual Humanities Lecture

Teacher of the year to discuss Faulkner's observations on speed of modern life Nov. 3

Dr. Jay Watson speaking at the opening of the Faulkner Books Exhibit.  Photo by Kevin Bain/Ole Miss Communications

Jay Watson speaks at the opening of the Faulkner Books exhibit. Photo by Kevin Bain/Ole Miss Communications

OXFORD, Miss. – Jay Watson, the Howry Professor of Faulkner Studies at the University of Mississippi, has been named the university’s Humanities Teacher of the Year and will deliver an annual lecture Nov. 3 at Bondurant Auditorium.

Watson’s lecture, titled “William Faulkner on Speed: What the Humanities Can Teach Us about the Velocity and Tempo of Modern Life,” it will explore Faulkner and the phenomenon of modern speed. The 7 p.m. event is free and open to the public.

Faulkner’s works illustrate how the humanities can provide a window into meaningful social issues that link our era with earlier ones, Watson said. Though speed has taken new forms since Faulkner’s day, the social consequences and challenges of speed remain with us today, and many of those challenges can already be glimpsed in Faulkner’s novels and stories.

Watson added the topic directly ties into his research about Faulkner and tempo, noting that it demonstrates how the humanities can offer a window into some of these interesting social problems.

The Humanities Teacher of the Year Award is given each October, which is National Arts and Humanities Month, to faculty members who make outstanding contributions to the humanities. The award is presented in the spring at the Mississippi Humanities Council’s awards ceremony.

Watson said he is honored to receive the award.

“It was an unexpected honor and a real delight, and it’s an award that brings with it a responsibility to stay focused on students and the classroom as the real intellectual and human center of the teaching life,” he said.

Watson is deserving of the award, said Richard Forgette, interim dean of the College of Liberal Arts.

“The Humanities Teacher of the Year Lecture is a celebration of the humanities,” Forgette said. “Professor Watson is being recognized for his outstanding work and significant contributions to teaching.”

Watson has been a member of the UM faculty for 25 years. He earned his bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Georgia and his master’s and doctoral degrees, both in English and American literature and language from Harvard University. He is also the recipient of the 2012 Faculty Achievement Award and nominee for the SEC Faculty Achievement Award. His articles on Southern literature and humanities have been featured in several publications, including American Quarterly, American Literature and Modern Fiction Studies.

The event is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and the Mississippi Humanities Council.

The Mississippi Humanities Council sponsors, supports and conducts a range of public programs in traditional liberal arts disciplines designed to promote understanding of our cultural heritage, interpret our own experience, foster critical thinking, encourage reasonable public discourse, strengthen our sense of community and thus empower Mississippi’s people with a vision for the future.

The College of Liberal Arts is the university’s oldest and largest division. Visit http://libarts.olemiss.edu for more information.

UM Biologist’s Research Makes News

Ryan Garrick studying tortoises in Galapagos Islands

photo credit: Yale University

photo credit: Yale University

A University of Mississippi biology professor’s study of giant tortoises in the Galapagos Islands is being published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal.

Ryan C. Garrick is the lead author of the paper “Lineage fusion in Galápagos giant tortoises,” which will appear in Molecular Ecology (one of the top journals in the field of population genetics and evolutionary biology). It will be accompanied by a “News and Views” perspective article, used to draw attention to high-profile research that is likely to be of interest to the public.

“The findings are of broad interest because it focuses on a geographic region central to Charles Darwin’s synthesis of ideas about evolution and natural selection,” Garrick said. “We also present unusually clean genetic data on a phenomenon occurring in nature that is rarely caught in the act: the fusion of two long-isolated lineages, one of which is very likely doomed to extinction.”

The paper was written in collaboration with researchers from Yale University, State University of New York at Syracuse, the University of British Columbia in Canada, the University of Florence in Italy and the Galapagos National Park Service in Ecuador. Chaz Hyseni, a UM doctoral student in biology, is among the co-authors.

Josh Gladden Elected to Two National Leadership Roles

NCPA director brings leadership, experience and vision to professional societies

Josh Gladden

Josh Gladden

OXFORD, Miss. – A University of Mississippi administrator and associate professor of physics and astronomy has been elected to two national societies’ leadership positions.

Joseph “Josh” Gladden, director of the university’s National Center for Physical Acoustics, is chair of the Acoustical Society of America’s Physical Acoustics Technical Committee. During his three-year term in the role, his primary duties are to represent the physical acoustics community to the larger ASA leadership, work to ensure a broad and robust representation of physical acoustics at the biannual ASA meetings, and to help implement tools and resources to advance and connect the international physical acoustics community.

Gladden is also a “member-at-large” for the topical Group on Instrumentation and Measurement Science, which is a unit of the American Physical Society. The focus of GIMS is to advance the development of new measurement tools and techniques by creating a forum for discussions, collaborations, awareness and recognition of significant achievements.

“I am honored to represent my colleagues in the national and international physical acoustics research community,” Gladden said. “My election to the GIMS came a bit of a surprise, but I am excited to get involved in this group.”

Gladden shared his vision for both groups.

“My primary goals as chair will be to increase and improve tools for physical acoustics researchers to connect and collaborate, as well is to maintain a wide range of topics being discussed at our biannual meetings,” he said. “The primary goal of the GIMS is to promote and provide a venue for dialogue on the development of new instrumentation and measurement techniques in the physics community.

“This is important because often, new breakthroughs in physics and science in general follow the development of a new tool which provides new insight.”

Gladden’s predecessor, Albert Migliori of Los Alamos National Lab, said he is confident the UM professor will make do a great job as chair.

“Josh eats, sleeps, breathes physical acoustics and is in both an intellectual and leadership position to advance the field better than anyone in the U.S.,” Migliori said. “Josh builds high-performance ultrasound measurements systems based on an advanced technology called Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy and uses them for cutting edge research.

“Because he builds, not buys, the measurement systems, he has unique research capabilities as well as providing real educational opportunities for budding scientists as students.”

Gladden joined the UM faculty as an assistant professor in 2005 after earning his Ph.D. and working as a postdoctoral fellow at Pennsylvania State University. Before that, he worked three years as a physics instructor at the United World College in Montezuma, New Mexico. The United World College is an international school for gifted students representing approximately 70 countries with a network of 10 sister campuses around the globe.

Gladden holds master’s and doctoral degrees in physics from the University of Montana and Penn State, respectively. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of the South and was a postdoctoral fellow at Penn State in 2003-2005.

Gladden co-authored a paper, “Motion of a Viscoelastic Micellar Fluid Around a Cylinder: Flow and Fracture,” which was listed in “Physics News of 2007″ by the American Physical Society. His other honors and awards include membership on the Emerging Leaders Conference steering committee of promising recent alumni of the University of the South, both the Duncan and Bradock Fellowships for doctoral students at Penn State, the Tandy Technology Scholars Award for Education in Science and the William T. Allen Award in Physics.

Gladden has co-authored 21 juried articles, been an invited speaker at 18 conferences and secured research grants totaling $621,005 over a seven-year period. Gladden’s research areas are resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, wormlike micellar materials, continuum and granular dynamics.

He and his wife, Nicole, have three children: Chase, Camille and Josephine.

Established in 1989, the NCPA has unique facilities and infrastructure, including an anechoic chamber, a Mach 5 wind tunnel, a jet test facility, a resonant ultraspectroscopy lab, Faraday labs and a multimillion dollar machine shop for in-house design. NCPA employs 30 permanent, full-time individuals, as well as 16 graduate students, five research fellows and eight undergraduates. Its research scientists are recognized experts in their fields, bringing experience from government, academia and industry.

To view Gladden’s website, go to http://www.phy.olemiss.edu/~jgladden/.

For more information about the UM National Center for Physical Acoustics, call 662-915-5889 or go to http://ncpa.olemiss.edu/.

Professor to Design Program in Wellness and Physical Activity

UM health and physical education expert developing emphasis for education majors

Alicia Stapp joins the UM School of Education faculty to lead the school's new emphasis in wellness and physical activity for education majors.

Alicia Stapp joins the UM School of Education faculty to lead the school’s new emphasis in wellness and physical activity for education majors.

OXFORD, Miss. – Health and physical education expert Alicia Stapp will lead the University of Mississippi School of Education‘s effort to implement a new emphasis in wellness and physical activity for elementary education majors starting in fall 2015.

The new focus on wellness and physical activity is the result of a $1.2 million grant awarded to the School of Education last fall by the Bower Foundation of Ridgeland. The emphasis will train future elementary teachers to integrate physical activity in the classroom to support academic achievement.

“I’m very excited to join an institution as innovative and forward-thinking as the Ole Miss School of Education,” said Stapp, a Florida native who comes to UM from the University of Central Florida. “We have an excellent opportunity to make an impact on not only in the way we train teachers, but on the unknown number of children our future graduates can positively impact in Mississippi schools.”

Stapp, an assistant professor of elementary education and wellness and physical activity, is designing the new curriculum, which is expected to include four specialized courses totaling 12 credits. The proposed coursework could cover research showing how active lifestyles positively affect learning in children, pedagogical theories, wellness integration strategies (i.e., introducing music and movement into lessons) and multiple, hands-on learning experiences allowing teacher candidates to observe working educators as part of class.

David Rock, UM education dean, originally approached the Bower Foundation about the new emphasis after he collaborated with the Move to Learn organization, also supported by Bower, which visits schools around the state showing how to implement fun and engaging physical activity into the classroom. The organization’s efforts are grounded in Mississippi-based research showing a direct correlation between improved test achievement, student behavior and physical activity levels.

“All the research out there shows that if you can stimulate physical activity of children, it can reduce absences and increases academic learning,” Rock explained. “Dr. Stapp is extremely dynamic and has an amazing passion for children and exercise.”

Stapp hopes to have the emphasis on the UM books by next fall. Another goal for the program is to work with the Mississippi Department of Education to create a new license endorsement in wellness and physical activity that could be acquired by completing the UM program.

“Dr. Stapp will teach pre-service teachers how to integrate wellness and physical activity into their existing curriculum,” said Susan McClelland, UM chair of teacher education. “This approach will help transform the general education classroom, ensuring increased opportunities for all children to experience success.”

Long-term, the new program will seek to place multiple graduates within individual schools to help make active learning and wellness an integral part of the culture within schools.

Before joining UM, Stapp taught in Florida public schools for 10 years and was an adjunct professor at UCF, where she taught courses on integrating arts and movement into classroom curricula. She holds a doctorate in instructional leadership from Nova Southeastern University, a master’s degree in physical education from Florida State University and a bachelor’s degree in social science education from UCF.

Galapagos Tortoises Topic for Science Cafe

UM biology professor will discuss preservation efforts in Oct. 21 presentation

³Photo courtesy of Yale University²

Photo courtesy of Yale
University

OXFORD, Miss. – Methods for conserving threatened and endangered species of tortoises is the topic for the next installment a monthly public science forum organized by the University of Mississippi Department of Physics and Astronomy.

The fall semester’s third meeting of the Oxford Science Cafe is set for 6 p.m. Oct. 21 at Lusa Pastry Cafe, 2305 West Jackson Ave. Ryan Garrick, UM assistant professor of biology, will discuss “Applications of genetics to Galapagos tortoise conservation.” Admission is free.

“Molecular genetics offers conservation biologists critical information upon which to design efficient, effective management strategies,” Garrick said. “Galapagos tortoises are flagships in this respect because captive breeding programs have been largely facilitated by genetic tools.”

Garrick’s 30-minute presentation will review recent work on this group.

“Occasionally, past hybridization can actually generate positive outcomes for conservation,” he said. “This is the case for Chelonoidis elephantopus, a species that was thought to have been extinct over 150 years ago. However, for another pair of evolutionarily distinct lineages of Galapagos tortoises, ongoing hybridization is likely to lead to a net loss of biodiversity via lineage collapse and replacement with a hybrid swarm.”

Garrick earned his bachelor’s and doctoral degrees from La Trobe University in Australia. He was a postdoctoral researcher at Virginia Commonwealth University and at Yale University.

Garrick’s research interests are insect evolution, molecular ecology, biogeography, population genetics and conservation biology.

For more information about Oxford Science Cafe programs, go to http://www.phy.olemiss.edu/oxfordsciencecafe. For more information about the Department of Physics and Astronomy, visit http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/physics_and_astronomy or call 662-915-5311.

UM Nutrition Expert Shares Healthy Snack Tips for Children

Good nutrition principles are fundamental for proper diet

Dr. Laurel Lambert, child nutrition expert, says all snacks should follow "basic nutrition principles.”

Laurel Lambert, child nutrition expert, explains how all snacks should follow ‘basic nutrition principles.’

OXFORD, Miss. – Combating the state’s obesity epidemic starts with teaching our children the principles of healthy eating, which is the focus of Laurel Lambert, associate professor of nutrition and hospitality management at the University of Mississippi.

While Lambert’s past experiences as a registered dietitian include medical nutrition therapy and institutional food services, her research focus is child nutrition.

“To get children excited about nutrition and meals is very rewarding,” Lambert said. “For example, a director of child nutrition in schools has an impact on students’ health from the time they enter the school until they leave.”

Along with school meals, schools also often prepare afternoon snacks. Healthy snacks can be prepared and consumed both in and out of school with a little nutrition know-how.

“Snacks are a great choice because children have little stomachs,” Lambert said. “We don’t want them to eat until they’re stuffed. In the past, I’ve worked with child nutrition development researchers, and they found that by age 5, children can lose the skill to identify when they’ve eaten too much, so snacks can teach basic feeding principles.

“You want to develop healthy snacks based on good nutrition principles. The goal is to learn the principles of nutrition and apply them to snacks. These are good starters, not a definitive list, but a list that can guide parents and children to make healthy choices.”

Healthy Homemade Snacks for Children

(Examples taken from the USDA’s Choose My Plate initiative)

  1. Trail Mix (dried fruit, unsalted nuts and popcorn): “Dried fruit is high in fiber, vitamins and minerals. For unsalted nuts, I prefer almonds, but cashews and pistachios are also good sources of nutrients. Popcorn is important because it can be prepared as a low-fat food, which decreases the overall calories of the snack. Plus, popcorn provides bulk and makes it more filling.”
  2. Veggie Sticks with Hummus: “Made from chick peas, hummus has become popular as a spread for different vegetables. It goes well with celery or carrots. It can even be placed on whole-grain crackers and pita bread.”
  3. Fruit Kabobs: “Fruit kabobs are prepared using a variety of fruit – bananas, apples, watermelon, cantaloupe or grapes, to name a few. I suggest having your child help with preparation. Your child can begin to learn knife skills, decide on the types of fruit to use and the order the fruit appears on the stick, therefore becoming involved with the food he or she eats.”
  4. Apple Wedge with Turkey: “Child nutrition programs often make snacks interesting by combining foods. You’re not just giving a child an apple; you’re giving him or her an apple wedge with a good source of protein, such as turkey. Luckily, fresh turkey is low-sodium by nature. It’s also important to notice that this is an apple wedge. We’re serving children, and it may be difficult to bite and chew on a whole apple. They need something easy to handle for their snack.”
  5. Peanut Butter Fruit-wich (whole-grain bread, 2 tablespoons of peanut butter, thinly sliced apple or banana): “If you have the chance to choose whole-grain over wheat, go for it. Whole-grain means the child is getting the complete grain, including the germ and the bran for extra fiber, vitamins and minerals. Only 2 tablespoons of peanut butter because portion control is important.”
  6. Ants on a Log (thinly spread peanut butter on celery sticks, topped with a row of raisins): “Ants on a log is always popular. Children enjoy it because of its name and the way it looks, and they have a fun time preparing it, too.”

“All of these snacks follow basic nutrition principles,” Lambert said. “They contain vitamins, minerals, high fiber, low sodium and low saturated fat.”

Parents should consider serving healthy beverages to their children, including water and 100-percent juice, she said. “Juice should never replace water because of the calories. However, a 1/2-cup of juice for breakfast or with a snack is a good choice.”

Finally, it is important to follow a snack schedule when feeding your child, Lambert said.

“After children come home from school, they are probably hungry,” she explained. “Having a snack prepared is a good choice. The easier you make it, the more likely the child is going to eat it.”

Law School to Host Annual Mississippi Sports Law Review Symposium

Event to focus on modern communications and sports broadcasting

The Sports Law Symposium is hosted annually by the Mississippi Sports Law Review, the only sports legal publication in the SEC.

The Sports Law Symposium is hosted annually by the Mississippi Sports Law Review, the only sports legal publication in the SEC.

OXFORD, Miss. – The Mississippi Sports Law Review will host its annual Mississippi Sports Law Review Symposium from 1 to 3 p.m. Oct. 17 in Weems Auditorium at the University of Mississippi School of Law.

This year’s topic is “Current Telecommunications Issues and Their Impact on Sports Broadcasting.”

“We are excited again to be welcoming a fantastic panel of experts for our fifth annual sports law symposium,” said William Berry, the publication’s adviser and assistant professor of law. “It should be a wonderful discussion that those interested in the intersection between sports and media will not want to miss.”

Each year, the publication brings in speakers to discuss a hot topic in the sports law arena. This year’s panelists include Babbette Boliek, professor at Pepperdine University School of Law; Robert Frieden, professor at the Penn State law school; Kristi Dosh, author of “Saturday Millionaires: How Winning Football Builds Winning Colleges” and a contributor to ESPN, Fox Sports and Forbes; and Terence High, attorney and NFL agent.

The Mississippi Sports Law Review is a biannual scholarly publication related to the intersection between the law and sports. This student-edited review contains articles from legal scholars, professionals and students addressing a wide range of issues affecting the sports law field.

“The MSLR is the only sports-related legal publication in the Southeastern Conference,” said Connor Bush, the review’s editor-in-chief. “The event attracts prominent members of the sports industry to the University of Mississippi School of Law, in part, because of the various resources attributed to an SEC university and to the law school’s continued support of the sports law specialization.”

The symposium is open to the public. Two hours of free CLE will be offered.

The MSLR and Sports Law Society will host a luncheon on at 12:30 p.m. Oct. 3 at the law school with Charlie Hussey, associate commissioner of SEC network relations. The event, in Weems Auditorium, is open to the public.

For more information about the event or the Mississippi Sports Law Review, contact Connor Bush at cjbush1@go.olemiss.edu or visit http://mssportslaw.olemiss.edu.

Mayo Clinic, University of Mississippi Medical Center Expand Relationship

Representatives of the University of Mississippi Medical Center and the Mayo Clinic on Tuesday signed an agreement to broaden and deepen their collaboration in clinical trials, other medical research, and education. Taking part in the signing at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota were (from left) Dr. Robert Rizza, Mayo Clinic liaison for the collaboration; Dr. Dan Jones, University of Mississippi chancellor; Dr. James Keeton, UMMC vice chancellor for health affairs and dean of the School of Medicine; Dr. LouAnn Woodward, UMMC associate vice chancellor for health affairs and vice dean of the School of Medicine; Dr. Richard Summers, UMMC associate vice chancellor for research; Dr. Gregory Gores, Mayo Clinic executive dean for research; Scott Kaese, Mayo Clinic operations administrator for research; and Steven C. Smith, Mayo Clinic chairman of the  Department of Research Administration.

Representatives of the University of Mississippi Medical Center and the Mayo Clinic on Tuesday signed an agreement to broaden and deepen their collaboration in clinical trials, other medical research, and education. Taking part in the signing at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota were (from left) Dr. Robert Rizza, Mayo Clinic liaison for the collaboration; Dr. Dan Jones, University of Mississippi chancellor; Dr. James Keeton, UMMC vice chancellor for health affairs and dean of the School of Medicine; Dr. LouAnn Woodward, UMMC associate vice chancellor for health affairs and vice dean of the School of Medicine; Dr. Richard Summers, UMMC associate vice chancellor for research; Dr. Gregory Gores, Mayo Clinic executive dean for research; Scott Kaese, Mayo Clinic operations administrator for research; and Steven C. Smith, Mayo Clinic chairman of the Department of Research Administration.

ROCHESTER, Minn. Mayo Clinic and the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) announced today that they have signed an agreement to broaden and deepen their collaboration in clinical trials, other medical research and education. The agreement is a formal commitment to enhance the relationship that has been steadily building for the past 20 years.

“This agreement builds on our already strong relationship with the University of Mississippi Medical Center and lays the groundwork for more discovery and application,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “We’re thrilled to work even more closely to improve care for patients.”

An earlier memorandum of understanding formed an institutional bond in 2010, designed to enhance and expand shared initiatives in translational research and training. A number of cooperative clinical research relationships have flourished between Mayo and UMMC since a first collaborative study was launched in 1995 in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA), with cohorts of non-Hispanic White Americans from Rochester, Minnesota, African-Americans from Jackson, Mississippi, and Mexican-Americans from Starr County, Texas.

Mayo’s and UMMC’s site principal investigators in GENOA, Stephen Turner, M.D., and Thomas Mosley, Ph.D., respectively, have continued to collaborate within GENOA, as well as in other genetic epidemiology-based research, seeking to better understand the differences in disease prevalence and progression between different racial and ethnic groups.

Daniel W. Jones, M.D., chancellor of the University of Mississippi, believes the relationship with Mayo Clinic can be transformational for the University of Mississippi Medical Center across its missions of research, education and health care.

“Expanding our existing research partnership with Mayo offers exciting possibilities for new discovery that will benefit Mississippians and people around the world,” says Dr. Jones. “Beyond that, though, the Mayo Clinic is the strongest brand in health care worldwide. We will benefit from the opportunity to apply Mayo-type approaches to management of a large, public health care enterprise such as ours. We look forward to the prospect that both partners will learn, grow and perhaps influence other public academic medical centers through this relationship.”

In addition to research into the genetic underpinnings of disease through epidemiological research, collaborative efforts between Mayo and UMMC include clinical research projects that look at genetic variations in treatment response.

“Mayo and UMMC are uniquely positioned when working together to improve our understanding of the way diseases develop and how different treatments can work among our nation’s increasingly diverse population,” says Robert Rizza, M.D., Mayo’s liaison for this collaboration. “Our combined education programs are growing as well, and we’re very excited to be exploring new avenues of understanding in such areas as rural and medically underserved communities.”

Many of the current Mayo-UMMC collaborations have been developed under the auspices of Mayo’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCaTS), for which UMMC’s James Wilson, M.D., serves as an external advisory committee member. These joint activities include enabling UMMC investigators to access (currently) 26 online training modules offered by Mayo Clinic; designation of Mayo as an elite “Vanguard Center” of the UMMC-affiliated Jackson Heart Study; and a number of collaborative studies relating to kidney disease, uterine fibroids, and more.

“This is the doorway to create more exciting opportunities between UMMC and all of Mayo Clinic,” says Richard Summers, M.D., associate vice chancellor for research at UMMC, and liaison for this collaboration. “We are going to use the synergy that already exists between our organizations to take clinical research and education to a whole new level.”

Future collaborations are planned in graduate education and the mentoring and development of emerging clinical researchers, and conducting faculty exchanges. The organizations expect to leverage Mayo’s metabolomics core with UMMC’s lipidomics capabilities, share Mayo’s clinical research unit tools software, co-develop an Adult Congenital Heart Disease Clinic in Jackson, enhance UMMC’s Cardiac Electrophysiology Device Trials unit, and potentially develop a cooperative telemedicine program.

The agreement will coordinate ongoing and new complementary goals of both organizations. In the future, the closer ties between Mayo and UMMC are expected to lead to new, cutting-edge collaborations.

UM Chemistry Professor, Postdoc Win R&D Magazine Top 100 Award

Collaborative research with ORNL yields breakthrough aluminum plating technology

Dr. Hussey with one of his students.

Charles Hussey with postdoctoral research associate Li-Hsien Chou.

OXFORD, Miss. – A revolutionary aluminum plating process developed at the University of Mississippi has been recognized as one of the most technologically significant products of 2014.

The Portable Aluminum Deposition System, or PADS, invented in the laboratory of UM chemistry chair and professor Charles Hussey, is a winner in R&D Magazine‘s 52nd annual R&D 100 Awards. The international competition recognizes excellence across a wide range of industries, including telecommunications, optics, high-energy physics, materials science chemistry and biotechnology. The award is considered to be the “Oscar” for inventors.

The work in Hussey’s lab is part of a larger project and carried out in collaboration with Sheng Dai and other scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United Technologies Research Center. At UM, Hussey worked closely with postdoctoral research associate Li-Hsien Chou to develop PADS. This aluminum plating technology is expected to replace hazardous coatings such as cadmium, thereby potentially strengthening the competitiveness of American manufacturing companies worldwide and cutting the cost of aluminum plating by a factor of 50 to 100.

PADS allows manufacturers to safely conduct aluminum deposition in open atmosphere for the first time. Aluminum cannot be plated from water or most other solvents, so a special electrolyte that enables the safe plating is a critical part of the device.

“As basic scientists studying fundamental process and phenomena, so much of what we do is not immediately useful or obvious to society,” Hussey said. “Here, we have made something unique and obviously useful. This is very satisfying.”

Chou, who earned her doctorate under Professor I-Wen Sun at National Cheng Kung University in Taiwan, is Hussey’s “academic granddaughter” because Sun is one of Hussey’s first doctoral graduates, having earned his Ph.D. at UM in 1989.

Winning the R&D award is a dream come true for Chou.

“Every scientist dreams one day to develop a useful product with their name on it, and we did,” Chou said. “I am so happy we can bring this recognition to Ole Miss.”

Hussey said he is pleased with his Chou’s contributions to the project.

“I am very proud of her and hope this will benefit her career,” he said. “After all, this is really what we do or should be doing in academia, developing people and helping them to be successful in their careers and lives.”

The judges were impressed by the development of a process to use air-sensitive ionic liquids in the open atmosphere to make an air-stable plating system.

“The availability of air-stable plating systems allows the technology to be used in the field, giving PADS a competitive advantage,” said Paul Livingstone, senior editor of R&D Magazine. “The technology’s lower cost of use and prospect for displacing toxic corrosion protection alternatives were additional factors that contributed to the selection of this winning technology.”

Research on the technology was stimulated by a research contract from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense to UM through ORNL. Plated aluminum is a protective coating and offers corrosion protection to any underlying metal.

Hussey has worked on ionic liquid projects for many years, including various U.S. Department of Energy projects involving the development of ionic liquid-based processes for the treatment of spent nuclear fuel.

The 2014 R&D 100 Awards banquet is set for Nov. 7 at the Bellagio hotel in Las Vegas.

For a full list of this year’s winners, visit http://www.rdmag.com/award-winners/2014/07/2014-r-d-100-award-winners. For more information about the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, go to http://chemistry.olemiss.edu.

UM Showcases Creations of Campus Artists

Ford Center gallery features work of 11 faculty members, Meek Hall hosts graduate student art show

UM Ph.D. Student Alona Alexander, a music education major from Madison, looks at the faculty art exhibit at the Ford Center. Photo by Michael Newsom/University Communications

UM doctoral student Alona Alexander, a music education major from Madison, looks at the faculty art exhibit at the Ford Center. Photo by Michael Newsom/University Communications

OXFORD, Miss. – The University of Mississippi is hosting an art show featuring the work of 11 faculty members in the gallery at the Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts through Oct. 24.

A reception honoring the artists of the exhibit is scheduled for 5-7 p.m. Oct. 9. There’s no admission fee to view the artwork or attend the reception.

The exhibit offers the public a chance to see paintings, prints and mixed media from the Department of Art’s distinguished faculty, said Virginia Rougon Chavis, associate professor and chair of the art department, who is also one of the featured artists.

“Our faculty members are nationally and internationally recognized for their research,” Rougon Chavis said. “This is a great opportunity for the public to see the work of our faculty from the art department right here on campus. While the Ford Center and the university does a great job at bringing outside artists and performers to campus, we also have some wonderful faculty doing exciting things in the area.”

The exhibit features the work of:

  • Paula Temple, professor emeritus of graphic design
  • Robert Malone, adjunct assistant professor of art
  • Ashley Chavis, adjunct assistant professor of art
  • Virginia Rougon Chavis , chair and associate professor of art
  • Ross Turner, visual resources specialist
  • Carlyle Wolfe, adjunct assistant professor of art
  • Brooke White, associate professor of imaging arts
  • Sheri Rieth, associate professor of art
  • Jere Allen, professor emeritus of painting
  • Amy Evans, adjunct art instructor
  • Jan Murray, associate dean of liberal arts and associate professor of art

Also, Gallery 130 in Meek Hall is showing works created by graduate art students in an exhibit running through Oct. 9. A reception is planned at Meek Hall on the same evening as the Ford Center reception, but it runs 4-6 p.m. to allow visitors to attend both events in one evening.

“The graduate students play an important role in the Department of Art,” Rougon Chavis said. “The work they create is more than the acquisition of knowledge under competent instruction. These students make a contribution to the art world that is of original and independent value.”