Pharmaceutics Graduate Student Honored for 3D Printing Research

Jiaxiang Zhang awarded Best Oral Presentation at annual pharmaceutical meeting

Jiaxiang Zhang

OXFORD, Miss. – Jiaxiang Zhang, a University of Mississippi graduate student in the School of Pharmacy’s Department of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, was awarded Best Oral Presentation at the annual meeting of the Controlled Release Society in New York City last month.

Zhang’s presentation focused on combining 3D printing with hot-melt extrusion, a process that melts and mixes polymers and drugs into rod-like shapes. Once formed, the rods can be delivered immediately into a 3D printer to create personalized drug dosages in the forms of tablets, capsules and films.

“Without Ole Miss, I wouldn’t have gotten this award,” Zhang said. “I’m thankful that the university has the facility and equipment for these projects and for the unprecedented freedom to explore new ideas, materials and designs.

“This award is not only for me, but also to encourage young scientists who want to help improve the lives of others through this field.”

Mike Repka, Zhang’s adviser and chair of the Department of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, has worked with Zhang for four years on his 3D printing research.

“Jiaxiang delivered an animated, yet clear, presentation that showed his interest in the topic and that he was deserving of this recognition,” said Repka, who is also director of the Pii Center for Pharmaceutical Technology. “His novel ideas have been great for our discussions and presentations at various conferences.”

After earning his pharmaceutical engineering degree from Northwest University in his home country of China, Zhang continues to grow his expertise. He hopes that this award, along with the resources within the School of Pharmacy, will help him solve problems facing the pharmaceutical industry.

“I was excited when I found out I got the award,” Zhang said. “The first thing I thought about was to inform Dr. Repka that our work was being recognized.

“He supported my research and inspired me throughout my study, from the big concepts to every single detail in the research. This affirms our academic efforts.”

Forensic Chemist Named 2018 Joseph Sam Distinguished Alumnus

Randall Clark earned his doctorate in medicinal chemistry from the School of Pharmacy

Randall Clark

OXFORD, Miss. – Randall Clark, a 1973 University of Mississippi graduate with a doctoral degree in medicinal chemistry, has been named the School of Pharmacy Department of BioMolecular Sciences’ 2018 Joseph Sam Distinguished Alumnus Award honoree.

Clark earned degrees in both biology and chemistry from Berry College in Mt. Berry, Georgia, before completing his Ph.D. under the direction of late Ole Miss professor Ronald F. Borne. He has spent his 45-year academic career at Auburn University, where he is a professor of medicinal chemistry, mentoring more than 50 master’s and doctoral students.

“It is truly an honor to be selected for this award,” Clark said. “Just receiving consideration for an award of this magnitude is a significant achievement.

“The previous recipients are all very successful individuals, and many, many very productive and talented people have passed through the Ole Miss School of Pharmacy.”

Clark will deliver the Joseph Sam Distinguished Alumnus Lecture at 11 a.m. Friday (Aug. 17) in Room 2066 of the Thad Cochran Research Center. His presentation is titled “Forensic Chemistry of New Psychoactive Substances: Regioisomer Differentiation in Cannabinoid, Cathinone and N-BOMe Drugs.”

“It’s a great privilege for our department to be able to recognize our alumni leaders in pharmaceutical sciences with the Joe Sam Distinguished Alumnus Endowment,” said Kristie Willett, chair of the Department of BioMolecular Sciences. “Having Dr. Clark back on campus provides our students and current faculty with a unique opportunity to expand their professional network and learn about cutting edge research in medicinal chemistry.”

With a research interest in forensic drug chemistry, Clark has received more than $2.5 million in research funding over the last 10 years from the National Institute of Justice, the research, development and evaluation agency of the U.S. Department of Justice. He has authored or co-authored more than 250 scientific publications.

Clark has served as the faculty chair of Auburn athletics’ drug testing oversight committee for the last 20 years. His research group has contributed more than 1,000 mass spectra of new druglike substances to the National Institute of Standards and Technology mass spectra database.

He is the recipient of Auburn’s Alumni Professorship, Distinguished Graduate Faculty Lectureship and the Sandra Kent Gilliland and David Louie Gilliland Endowed Professorship in recognition of outstanding research and teaching accomplishments. In 2012, he was awarded a New Zealand Government International Fellowship to present a series of workshops and lectures on forensic drug science.

John Rimoldi, professor of medicinal chemistry and environmental toxicology at the UM School of Pharmacy, served on the award’s selection committee and knew Clark was a perfect fit for the accolade.

“Dr. Clark is most deserving of this award,” Rimoldi said. “He has built a distinguished career at Auburn University and is a leading authority in forensic drug chemistry and analysis. 

“His commitment to student mentoring and graduate education in medicinal chemistry is remarkable and inspiring.”

The award’s namesake, Joseph Sam, was an influential part in educating future scientists in the field of drug development and discovery. He served as one of the first chairs of the Department of Medicinal Chemistry, as well as dean of the university’s Graduate School and vice chancellor of research. In honor of his spirit and inspiration, the Joseph Sam Distinguished Alumnus Award was created in 2009.

“Dr. Sam was a constant figure in the labs and other pharmacy facilities,” Clark said. “He took a personal interest in all the graduate students in the program and provided encouragement to everyone. He and the members of the pharmacy family at Ole Miss made my four years in graduate school a most enjoyable experience.”

Two UM Pharmacy Faculty to Lead Mississippi Pharmacists Association

Lauren Bloodworth and Phil Ayers working to promote profession across state

Lauren Bloodworth

OXFORD, Miss. – The Mississippi Pharmacists Association has welcomed two faculty members from the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy into leadership positions for the organization.

Lauren Bloodworth, clinical associate professor of pharmacy practice, will serve as the organization’s president for the 2018-19 term, and Phil Ayers, also a clinical associate professor of pharmacy practice, is MPhA’s interim executive director.

“For years, I have been proud to serve alongside our tremendous pharmacy family, and I am honored by the opportunity to serve as the next president of the Mississippi Pharmacists Association,” Bloodworth said.

Phil Ayers

MPhA connects pharmacists from all areas of the profession to one other and with other health care professions to promote pharmacy and patient welfare across the state.

Both Ayers and Bloodworth are graduates of the Ole Miss pharmacy school. Ayers joined the faculty in 1997 after graduating in 1996. Bloodworth graduated in 2000 and joined the school’s faculty in 2008.

David D. Allen, dean of the School of Pharmacy and ex officio member of MPhA’s executive committee, said the School of Pharmacy is “very proud” to have Ayers and Bloodworth lead the organization.

“Lauren and Phil are both extremely dedicated to bolstering Mississippi’s pharmacy landscape and are natural fits for these positions,” Allen said.

UM Dean Becomes National Pharmacy Association President

David D. Allen assumes leadership of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

David D. Allen, dean of the UM School of Pharmacy, takes over this week as the new president of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Photo by by James Patterson

OXFORD, Miss. – David D. Allen, dean of the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, will be inducted as the president of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy on Wednesday (July 25) at the organization’s annual meeting.

“From the moment I joined the organization, I had opportunities to learn, develop, grow and make contacts, and then later, opportunities to serve and give back,” said Allen, who has been involved with AACP for more than 20 years, serving as chair of the Council of Deans, Advocacy Committee, Costs of Experiential Education Task Force, Biological Sciences Section and Student Services Special Interest Group, as well as a member of several other committees.

“The opportunity to continue to give back with this role was really the driving force in wanting to be considered, and I was very humbled to be elected.”

AACP is the national organization representing pharmacy education and includes the country’s accredited pharmacy schools and colleges.

“The primary focus of my presidency is going to be on leadership,” Allen said. “I’d like to focus not only on enabling people in schools of pharmacy to become leaders with titles and administrative roles but also for faculty to lead from within their roles.”

Many faculty members don’t necessarily want an administrative title or role but want to have an impact. Allen said he likes to call such people “faculty champions.”

“They are key individuals who make meaningful contributions in very important processes but don’t necessarily have an administrative role or title,” he said. “Pharmacy is a rapidly changing field, and I am excited to continue to find ways for pharmacy educators to contribute to the progress of the profession.”

Allen’s election is well-deserved, said Lucinda L. Maine, executive vice president and CEO of AACP.

“David is passionate about quality pharmacy education at all levels, and his focus is on the leadership contributions across the academy,” she said. “He knows that moving forward in these important arenas requires advanced preparation.

“I’ve now worked with almost 20 incoming presidents (including former UM pharmacy Dean Barbara Wells). They have all been fantastic, but David’s preparation for the year has no rivals.”

As president, Allen said some of his most important responsibilities are advocating for pharmacy education and the pharmacy profession and continuing to strive to make sure the academy and individual schools and colleges are training people to have a strong impact on the health and well-being of people across the country. He also said he’ll promote his home university every chance he gets.

“I’m going to be traveling a lot as president of AACP, and each time I’m in front of another school, college or organization as president, the University of Mississippi and its School of Pharmacy will be named, which can provide positive and beneficial exposure,” Allen said. “It also gives me an opportunity, if prompted, to talk about what a great place the Ole Miss School of Pharmacy is and what extraordinary people we have here.”

Allen has served as dean of the UM pharmacy school since January 2012. He is also executive director and research professor of UM’s Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, and a professor of pharmacology. He received his bachelor’s degree in pharmacy and Ph.D. in pharmaceutical sciences from the University of Kentucky.

Founded in 1900, AACP is the national organization representing the interests of pharmacy education. It comprises 139 accredited colleges and schools with pharmacy degree programs. For more information, visit https://www.aacp.org.

Pharmacy School Welcomes Tougaloo College to Preferred Admission Program

Third state institution joins program to benefit future pharmacists

Jinghe Mao (left), dean of the Tougaloo College Division of Natural Science; Richard McGinnis, chemistry professor at Tougaloo College; Kris Harrell, associate dean of academic affairs for the UM School of Pharmacy; and pharmacy Dean David D. Allen meet to finalize the Preferred Admission Program agreement between the two institutions. Submitted photo

OXFORD, Miss. – In an effort to expand access to pharmacy education within the state, the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy has completed its third admission agreement in a year with a Mississippi college.

Tougaloo College and the pharmacy school have partnered in a Preferred Admission Program that offers admission for Tougaloo freshmen who excel in pre-pharmacy classes and demonstrate a passion for service activities.

This initiative of the School of Pharmacy is meant to encourage more students to apply to pharmacy school who may prefer to complete pre-pharmacy courses at institutions that are closer to home or that offer more affordable tuition.

“The Preferred Admission Program will allow us to reach some of the best and brightest future pharmacists enrolled in Mississippi’s other college and university partners,” said Kris Harrell, the pharmacy school’s associate dean for academic affairs. “It’s a win-win-win for the students, the partner institutions and the School of Pharmacy.”

The Preferred Admission Program contributes to the university’s mission of making a positive impact on the lives of Mississippians, Chancellor Jeffrey Vitter said.

“As Mississippi’s flagship institution, UM’s top priority is to use its resources to transform lives and communities,” Vitter said. “The School of Pharmacy’s Preferred Admission Program simultaneously increases educational opportunities across the state and contributes to the future of health care in Mississippi and beyond.”

Students admitted via the Preferred Admission Program will assume a traditional graduation track to earn a Doctor of Pharmacy degree. Alcorn State University and Jackson State University also are part of the program.

Beverly Wade Hogan, president of Tougaloo College, said she is pleased that her institution is participating in the program.

“Traditionally, a significant percentage of our graduates enter graduate and professional schools to study medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and other fields of health care immediately after receiving their undergraduate degrees,” Hogan said. “This is an opportunity for more of our graduates who are interested in pharmacy to study and stay in Mississippi, retaining the talents and skills so critically important to strengthening Mississippi and positioning it for heightened competitiveness.”

David D. Allen, dean of the School of Pharmacy, also stressed the benefits the Preferred Admission Program could have on patients.

“The goal of this partnership is to educate the very best future pharmacists who will contribute to and innovate within health care for the benefit of their patients,” Allen said. “Providing more opportunities for students interested in pharmacy can positively impact our profession for years to come.”

For more information on the Preferred Admission Program, contact  Harrell at kharrell@olemiss.edu.

Jackson Heart Study Vanguard Center at Oxford Debuts New Leadership

School of Applied Sciences commits to building research capacity in early-stage researchers

Paul Loprinzi (center), associate professor of health, exercise science and recreation management, celebrates his appointment as primary investigator and administrator for the Jackson Heart Study Vanguard Center at Oxford alongside Tossi Ikuta (left), assistant professor of communication sciences and disorders, who will continue to serve as data curator and Vokay Addoh (right), assistant professor of health, exercise science and recreation management, who will serve as the new director of research engagement. Submitted photo

OXFORD, Miss. – The Oxford-based Jackson Heart Study Vanguard Center that serves as a secondary data repository for the largest single-site, prospective, epidemiologic investigation of cardiovascular disease among African-Americans ever undertaken is under new leadership from the School of Applied Sciences at the University of Mississippi.

Paul Loprinzi, associate professor of health, exercise science and recreation management, has accepted the appointment as primary investigator and administrator. Tossi Ikuta, assistant professor of communication sciences and disorders, will continue to serve as data curator, and Ovuokerie Addoh, assistant professor of health, exercise science and recreation management, will serve as director of research engagement.

“The purpose of JHS is to engage and mentor faculty and graduate students in collaborative research, analysis and ancillary study requests,” said Teresa Carithers, interim dean of applied sciences. “Part of mentorship and capacity-building is to recognize unique potential in early stage investigators.

“Each of these faculty have unique skills and can bring novel approaches to this population-based longitudinal study.”

Teresa Carithers

Carithers was invited in as an investigator with the original JHS exam and wrote the initial diet assessment protocols while serving as co-primary investigator for the diet and physical activity sub-study. The sub-study resulted in the validation and calibration of two culturally sensitive food frequency questionnaires in a successful collaboration with USDA researchers.

Carithers, along with Ben Banahan from the UM School of Pharmacy, submitted the IHL request for the Vanguard Center in Oxford and served as the initial co-primary investigators. Banahan will continue as primary investigator for the School of Pharmacy, and Carithers will continue as an investigator and mentor.

The School of Applied Sciences has been intentional about capacity building among faculty researchers, as current research requires more robust and novel conceptual design, Carithers said.

“I expect great success from the new applied sciences leadership based upon their ability to design and execute innovative research with interdisciplinary collaboration and support of minority investigators, both key elements to the overall Jackson Heart Study’s mission,” she said.

“Dr. Loprinzi is a prolific publisher and highly respected mentor with deep familiarity of the data needed to examine health and physical activity. Dr. Addoh, a new assistant professor, came to UM with a medical background before earning his Ph.D. with us, which will lend a new area of expertise to our team. Dr. Ikuta is a neuroscientist who manages monumental amounts of neuroimaging data in his own research, so he brings both technical skill and unique research interest to this study.”

Ben Banahan

Funded by the National Institute of Health, JHS is a community-based cohort study of risk factors for cardiovascular disease among adult African-American men and women living in the Jackson metropolitan area.

A collaboration among three Jackson-area academic institutions, JHS operates a field center and a coordinating center with the University of Mississippi Medical Center; a community outreach center and graduate training/education center with Jackson State University; and an undergraduate training and education center with Tougaloo College.

JHS is supported by contracts from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, part of the National Institutes of Health.

For more information about Jackson Heart Study or the work done at Vanguard Centers such as the one at UM’s Oxford campus, visit http://www.jacksonheartstudy.org.

University Joins Pharmaceutical Research Collective

Ole Miss becomes 18th member of the National Institute for Pharmaceutical Technology & Education

The Hands-On Course in Tablet Technology at the School of Pharmacy is one of the university’s research initiatives that complements the mission of the National Institute for Pharmaceutical Technology & Education. UM photo by Sydney Slotkin DuPriest

OXFORD, Miss. – The University of Mississippi is the newest member of an elite group of 18 universities that make up the National Institute for Pharmaceutical Technology & Education.

NIPTE is a nonprofit organization that works to improve the design, development and manufacturing processes of pharmaceutical products by connecting members of the pharmaceutical industry with top-ranked pharmaceutical educational programs.

“The University of Mississippi was selected to join NIPTE due to our exemplary faculty, facilities and reputation in key pharmaceutical areas that complement and strengthen the NIPTE mission,” said Mike Repka, chair of the School of Pharmacy’s Department of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery.

The university’s, and specifically the School of Pharmacy‘s, research infrastructure, pharmaceutical manufacturing expertise and related graduate programs fit well within NIPTE’s goal of improving the way pharmaceutical products are manufactured, said Walt Chambliss, UM interim associate vice chancellor for research and sponsored programs and professor of pharmaceutics.

“We believe being a member of NIPTE will enhance our ability to secure research funding to make significant advancements in pharmaceutical development and manufacturing,” Chambliss said.

NIPTE also offers membership to faculty and researchers from member universities who work in related fields, making it easier to collaborate on multidisciplinary projects. Ole Miss is the third SEC institution to join NIPTE, following the University of Kentucky and Texas A&M University.

Chambliss also noted that the National Center for Natural Products Research, which is housed within the school, stands to benefit from the university’s NIPTE membership, as NCNPR scientists can offer their specialized expertise in natural products pharmaceutical development.

“Being part of a network of pharmaceutical scientists and engineers with interests in pharmaceutical development and manufacturing is a key benefit of NIPTE membership,” he said.

This membership complements several initiatives within the School of Pharmacy meant to advance pharmaceutical development, including the Hands-On Course in Tablet Technology, the Natural Products Training Laboratory and the new industrial pharmacy master’s degree track.

As part of the membership, pharmacy Dean David D. Allen will serve as a member of the NIPTE board of directors, helping oversee its financial matters and ensure the success of ongoing projects. 

“The School of Pharmacy is thrilled to represent the University of Mississippi by offering its broad pharmaceutical research expertise to help solve challenges within the pharmaceutical industry,” Allen said.

UM Team Places Third in Pharmacy Quality Alliance Challenge

Students devised business proposal to reduce opioid abuse

Siddhi Korgaonkar

OXFORD, Miss. – A team from the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy placed third out of 22 teams in the Pharmacy Quality Alliance’s Healthcare Quality Innovation Challenge last month in Baltimore.

The four-student group consisted of third-year student pharmacists Mariah Cole, of Meridian; and Anna Crider, of Brentwood, Tennessee; as well as pharmacy administration graduate students Sushmitha Inguva, of Hyderabad, India; and Siddhi Korgaonkar, of Mumbai, India.

“I was very proud of our group and thought they did a superb job of presenting their proposal and answering questions from the judges,” said Ben Banahan, director of the Center for Pharmaceutical Marketing and Management and professor of pharmacy administration. “Though we might be slightly biased, the UM faculty in attendance truly thought our team would get first place.

“They provided a great practical approach for improving access without developing a costly competitive system that was based on electronic health record systems.”

The team was tasked with submitting a business summary around the prompt “Addressing Potentially Unsafe Opioid Use.” The students’ goal was to develop a plan that alleviated the time-consuming effort for health care professionals to manually track and monitor a patient’s history of prescription opioid use.

Anna Crider

The result was “Interactive Coordination in Healthcare Promoting Safe and Effective Prescription Drug Use” or “iCHOOSE Rx.” The proposed computer/phone application would give providers an easier and more useful method to understand a patient’s history and manage their pain effectively.

“Addiction is a serious issue in the United States, which is costly to our health system,” Cole said. “As a future pharmacist, I feel compelled to monitor for potential medication abuse.

Mariah Cole

“In addition, pharmacists play a great role in dealing with the current opioid crisis, so I was intrigued to improve prescription monitoring for all health care professionals.”

With their proposal submitted, the team prepared a presentation for judges at the PQA annual convention. Inguva said the team felt comfortable onstage.

“We were nervous about answering the judges’ questions since we did not know what to expect,” she said. “In order to prepare for it, the team conducted mock sessions where members would speculate potential questions, and then everyone would discuss how to tackle them.”

Sushmitha Inguva

The team originated from collaboration between the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy and International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research student chapters. The challenge provided an opportunity to learn from each other and spread awareness about each professional organization.

“Working with a team this size was a wonderful learning experience,” Crider said. “Being from different educational backgrounds, we each brought an aspect of creativity and knowledge to the proposal to make it thorough and applicable in the real world.

“This experience taught me how critical it is for each person working in a group to have different interests and education because it helps broaden the scope of conversation and interaction.”

Pharmacy Students Receive Gateway to Research Scholarships

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education award encourages students to pursue careers in research

Mary Paige Thrash

OXFORD, Miss. – Austin Fitts and Mary Paige Thrash, both rising second-year professional students at the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, have been named recipients of the Gateway to Research Scholarship by the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education.

The award provides students an opportunity to work on faculty-mentored research projects while improving their knowledge of clinical skills.

“I was extremely excited because this fellowship, quite literally, will be used as my gateway to research the topics which I am interested in, such as oncology,” said Fitts, a native of Myrtle.

Fitts has worked with Chalet Tan, UM associate professor of pharmaceutics and drug delivery, exploring the delivery of microRNA via exosomes to treat a variety of cancers. His interest in this area came after studying the isolation and characterization of exosomes at Jackson State University in summer 2016.

Fitts hopes this award will assist in his plan of earning a doctorate in biochemistry, cancer biology or medicinal chemistry.

“I am very proud of Austin for receiving this scholarship,” Tan said. “Austin has an inquisitive mind and unusually strong interest in cancer biology and drug delivery. His undergraduate research training was exceptional, which is the key impetus for the current project.”

Austin Fitts

Originally from Columbus, Thrash is studying new ways to target and defeat cancer cells along with forming new therapies. She said she believes this award will allow her to develop new laboratory skills.

“When I heard the good news, I was very excited,” Thrash said. “I am excited for the opportunity to be a part of the research community that is making strides to advance the field of medicine. I am honored to be given this chance to learn and work alongside faculty who have inspired and supported me throughout my research experience.”

Thrash recently helped design and create new molecules that could have potential therapeutic benefits for diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s and based her Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College thesis on the research. She is a member of the research team of John Rimoldi, UM professor of medicinal chemistry and environmental toxicology, who called Thrash’s commitment to research “extraordinary.”

“I was thrilled to learn that Mary Paige was awarded this highly competitive AFPE scholarship,” Rimoldi said. “She is most deserving of this award, and I am confident she will make significant and impactful contributions towards her proposed research in drug discovery and development.”

UM Pharmacy and Alcorn State Partner in Admission Program

ASU becomes second state institution to join Preferred Admission Program

Alcorn State University has agreed to join the Preferred Admission Program for the UM School of Pharmacy, which will offer admission to qualified Alcorn State students. Submitted photo

OXFORD, Miss. – The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy has signed an agreement with Alcorn State University to offer admission to qualified Alcorn State students who excel in freshman pre-pharmacy courses and participate in service activities.

This partnership, called the Preferred Admission Program, is part of both the School of Pharmacy’s and Alcorn State’s more-than-century-old traditions of dedication to the health of the state and its communities.

UM Chancellor Jeffrey Vitter praised the agreement, saying that it demonstrated a commitment to the university’s mission of contributing to the well-being of Mississippians.

“Facilitating broader access to education is one of the University of Mississippi’s foundational priorities,” Vitter said. “The School of Pharmacy’s Preferred Admission Program will benefit not only the students involved, but the overall pharmacy profession as well.”

Alcorn State is the second of three Mississippi institutions, along with Jackson State University and Tougaloo College, that are part of the Preferred Admission Program.

UM pharmacy students work in a skills lab on the Oxford campus. UM photo by Sydney Slotkin DuPriest

“Alcorn is incredibly excited to be launching this unique collaboration with Mississippi’s premier pharmacy school,” said Alfred Rankins Jr., Alcorn State president. “This engaging partnership will greatly benefit our high-achieving student scholars by providing direct access to post-graduate opportunities in a critically important health care profession.”

Once admitted, students in the Preferred Admission Program will be on the pharmacy school’s traditional graduation track to earn a Doctor of Pharmacy degree.

“This partnership is an integral part of our school’s commitment to educating pharmacists who will provide the best possible care for patients,” said David D. Allen, dean of the School of Pharmacy. “We recognize that providing more opportunities for motivated students ensures the continued quality of pharmacy’s essential contributions to health care.”

For more information on the Preferred Admission Program, contact Kris Harrell, the School of Pharmacy’s associate dean for academic affairs, at kharrell@olemiss.edu.