UM Museum Launches New Program for Middle Schoolers and Teens

Workshops combine art projects, music and milkshakes

OXFORD, Miss. – The University of Mississippi Museum is launching a new after-school program for students in grades 6-12. One Friday a month, the museum will offer a workshop featuring a mashup of two different artists or styles into one fun project that allows students to explore new media, techniques and forms of art.

These workshops are led by a team of university students eager to work with younger students as they explore their creativity. To add to the fun, museum workers will play music and make milkshakes as a delicious after-school treat as participants create their own works of art.

“We know as kids reach the middle school and teen years their schedules get packed with different activities and commitments, so we wanted to offer an easy, registration-free opportunity for teens to explore their artistic voices and experience the museum in new ways,” said Emily Dean, the museum’s curator of education.

The workshops will be held this semester from 4 to 5 p.m. Sept. 26, Oct. 24 and Nov. 21. The cost for each workshop is $10 per participant, which includes milkshakes and art materials for the projects. Pre-registration is not required, but space is limited, so participants are encouraged to contact Dean at esdean@olemiss.edu to reserve a space.

The University Museum, which is celebrating 75 years of exhibition and service to the community, is at the intersection of University Avenue and Fifth Street. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays. For more information, visit http://museum.olemiss.edu or contact Dean at esdean@olemiss.edu or 662-915-7073.

Fall Football Touchdown! Kicks Off at UM Museum

Semester's first family day features fun activities for all

Local children enjoy painting outside the UM Museum.

Local children enjoy painting outside the UM Museum.

OXFORD, Miss. – Football season is in full swing, and the University of Mississippi Museum is getting into the spirit with a new exhibit featuring one-of-a-kind football helmets, entitled “Bloomingdale’s Fashion Touchdown,” and a fun day of family activities inspired by it.

The helmets were created by world-famous fashion designers for an auction to benefit the NFL Foundation. The museum’s first Family Day of the semester is inspired by this fun, family-friendly exhibit. Kids can design their own football helmets, participate in an obstacle course and taste healthy tailgating snacks. Families can pick up spirit gear and prizes donated by Ole Miss Athletics, meet surprise guests and enter a raffle to win free Ole Miss football tickets.

The event runs 10 a.m. to noon Saturday (Sept. 20) at the museum. Families can drop in any time within the two hours; this event is free and registration is not required. All ages are welcome, although children must be accompanied by an adult.

Children show off art projects they made at the museum.

Children show off art projects they made at the museum.

This event is supported by the UM Department of Athletics and is part of the museum’s involvement in the “Let’s Move! Museums and Gardens Initiative.”

“This exhibit and family day are very different than what many may expect to see at the museum, but we are so excited for the opportunity to celebrate fall, football and art all in one fun day for families,” said Emily Dean, curator of education. “We have been really fortunate to have wonderful partners in athletics who have added to the spirit and fun of this event.”

The University Museum, which is celebrating 75 years of exhibition and service to the community, is at the intersection of University Avenue and Fifth Street. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays. For more information, visit http://museum.olemiss.edu or contact Dean at esdean@olemiss.edu or 662-915-7073.

University of Mississippi Museum Exhibition Advisory

UM Museum presents "Our Faith Affirmed - Works from the Gordon W. Bailey Collection"

Purvis Young, Angels Playing Music (detail), Gordon W. Bailey Collection

Purvis Young, Angels Playing Music (detail), Gordon W. Bailey Collection

The University of Mississippi Museum presents “Our Faith Affirmed – Works from the Gordon W. Bailey Collection” (Sept. 10, 2014-Aug. 8, 2015), which celebrates, in our 75th anniversary year, a major gift by Gordon W. Bailey of inspired artworks created by African-American self-taught artists from the South. This exhibit features works by 27 artists, all born between 1900 and 1959. Many of the artists are widely known and several, most notably, Thornton Dial Sr., Roy Ferdinand, Bessie Harvey, Lonnie Holley, Charlie Lucas, Jimmy Lee Sudduth and Purvis Young, are internationally exhibited.

“As a leading scholar, collector and curator, Mr. Bailey is uniquely positioned to make an impact in the life of this university,” said Robert Saarnio, museum director. “His generosity of spirit and vision are extraordinary and its meaningfulness to our museum and to the communities we serve, both academic and public, will surely be felt for generations to come. His astute assessment that an academic campus-based museum with educational programs for schoolchildren, the general public and university students stands uniquely positioned to leverage its collections for broad educational impact will prove prescient.”

Bailey states: “I considered the history of the region and the nature of the race-based incidents that still, on occasion, shake the university and became convinced that this was the right place to make this commitment. I believe that the arts are the cultural mortar that connects diverse communities. There are many good people here – of all races and socio-economic levels – pulling, or in some cases pushing, in the same direction. The University Museum is a terrific place to pay tribute to African-American, Southern self-taught artists who persevered and, against the odds, created works of genius.”

Overview

“Our Faith Affirmed – Works from the Gordon W. Bailey Collection,” curated by Gordon W. Bailey and David Houston, underscores the significance of Southern vernacular artists whose influence extend far beyond the realm of aesthetics. Confident, singular and insistent, the artworks created by the African-Americans honored in this exhibition exude an authority of experience and directness of expression that bear witness to the considerable weight of Southern history, the saga of American politics and, most clearly, to their faith and clarity of vision.

David Houston comments: “With this gift, my friend and co-curator, Gordon W. Bailey, a respected scholar and collector, has considerably broadened the scope of the museum’s impressive collections. As he intuited, the university’s geographic location sets the framework for the further exploration of Southern self-taught artists whose works are emblematic of the region’s culture. Some of the artists have daunting personal histories and were dually stressed by the adversities of poverty and oppression while dealing with the daily tribulations of living in a legally segregated society. All, though unique individuals with decidedly different iconographies and points of view, share context. Whatever their motivation – inner necessity, visionary impulse, political activism, faith in God, nature or nurture – it is clear that they did not need the mechanisms of the art world to either inspire their works or validate the importance of their efforts. For them, the raging authenticity and soulful expressiveness that is chiefly responsible for their newfound popular and critical acceptance is solid evidence that they never bowed to limitations or expectations. In fact, they seldom altered their content of purpose, whether cut off from the larger culture by geography or by law.”

Artists

Leroy Almon, Hawkins Bolden, Richard Burnside, Charles Butler, Archie Byron, Arthur Dial, Thornton Dial Jr., Thornton Dial Sr., Roy Ferdinand, Charles Gillam, Ralph Griffin, Bessie Harvey, Lonnie Holley, Robert Howell, Edwin Jeffery Jr., Joe Light, Charlie Lucas, Sulton Rogers, O.L. Samuels, Welmon Sharlhorne, Henry Speller, Jimmy Lee Sudduth, James “Son” Thomas, Felix “Harry” Virgous, Willie White, Luster Willis and Purvis Young.

Catalog

The exhibition is complemented by an illustrated catalog, edited by Gordon W. Bailey, featuring insightful essays by David Houston, director of the Bo Bartlett Center at Columbus State University’s College of the Arts in Columbus, Georgia; W. Ralph Eubanks, editor of the venerable Virginia Quarterly Review and a UM alumnus; and Jason “PyInfamous” Thompson, UM alumnus and Sally McDonnell-Barksdale Honors College Scholar, an acclaimed hip-hop emcee and songwriter. The essays contribute substantially to understanding the challenges faced by African-American self-taught artists in the South.

The University Museum, at the corner of University Avenue and Fifth Street, is open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays. Admission is free. For more information, visit http://museum.olemiss.edu or call 662-915-7073.

High resolution images are available upon request.

University Museum Offers Enriching After-School Art Program

ArtZone draws from permanent collection and traveling exhibitions to inspire students

ArtZone will begin Sept. 9 and run through Dec. 4

ArtZone will begin Sept. 9 and run through Dec. 4

OXFORD, Miss. – Summer break is over and with schools starting back up, it is almost time for Fall 2014 ArtZone at the University of Mississippi Museum. This year’s ArtZone will revolve around exhibits from the museum’s permanent collection and traveling exhibitions.

The ArtZone semester begins Sept. 9 and runs through Dec. 4, with sessions going from 3 to 5:05 p.m. weekly. Participants will be inspired by ancient civilizations, folk art and special exhibits.

“ArtZone is a truly unique program here in Oxford as each week, children are inspired by art and artifacts from our collections and beyond in an educational, fun and hands-on way,” said Emily Dean, the museum’s curator of education. “The museum comes to life for these young learners in a way that they will remember for years to come. We travel back in time, dabble in modern art and push the limits of creativity, all culminating in a final exhibit of student work here at the museum.”

Fees for the 12-week ArtZone semester are $70 per family for museum members at the family level or higher and $150 per family for nonmembers. All supplies and snacks are included. Parents can choose to enroll their children in the Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday classes. Each day will offer two different classes to suit different age groups.

Space is limited and the registration deadline is Sept. 1. Parents can pick up a registration form at the museum or download a copy here.

For more information about the museum’s Fall 2014 ArtZone, visit http://museum.olemiss.edu/artzone-•-fall-2014/ or contact Emily Dean at esdean@olemiss.edu.

The University Museum, which is celebrating 75 years of exhibitions and service to the community, is at the intersection of University Avenue and Fifth Street. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays. For more information, visit http://museum.olemiss.edu or call 662-915-7073.

University Museum Scores Fashion Touchdown

New exhibit showcases one-of-a-kind designer helmets created to benefit the NFL Foundation

An NFL helmet designed by Alexis Bittar is a highlight of a new exhibit at the University Museum. Photo courtesy of Bloomingdale's.

An NFL helmet designed by Alexis Bittar is a highlight of a new exhibit at the University Museum. Photo courtesy of Bloomingdale’s.

OXFORD, Miss. – Fashionistas and football fans alike will find reasons to celebrate with the University Museum‘s newest installation, “Bloomingdale’s Fashion Touchdown: NFL Haute Couture Helmets.” The exhibit is the only one of its kind featuring designer football helmets from Bloomingdale’s Fashion Touchdown, a project that benefited the NFL Foundation.

In celebration of Super Bowl XLVIII, the first Super Bowl ever held in the New York City area, Bloomingdale’s, the NFL and the Council of Fashion Designers of America seized an opportunity to highlight football and fashion for a great cause. Their collaboration engaged some of the world’s top designers to put their creative touches on 48 NFL helmets, which were auctioned off during an online charity event that raised more than $73,000 to benefit the NFL Foundation.

Robert Saarnio, University Museum director, took part in the auction and acquired three helmets for the museum’s collection. The exhibit will feature the actual helmets designed by Alexis Bittar, Fenton/Fallon and Lela Rose. High-resolution photographs of the remaining helmets – created by fashion icons Helmut Lang, Kenneth Cole, Nicole Miller and others – complete the exhibit.

“No other museum in the country is showcasing all of the helmets, and we are thrilled to be on the cutting edge of this unique concept,” Saarnio said. “The exhibit has the potential to draw in an entirely new audience for us, and we are grateful for the cooperation from Bloomingdale’s to help make this happen.”

Bloomingdale’s is supplying the museum with photographs of the entire collection, as well as an interactive video featuring rotating images of the helmets.

“When planning our marketing campaigns, especially those with a charity component, we hope they reach a large audience,” said Anne Keating, Bloomingdale’s senior vice president of public relations, special events and corporate philanthropy. “For the Bloomingdale’s brand and our commitment to giving back to be a focus of an exhibit in such a prestigious university is more than anyone could hope for, and we are proud to support this exhibit.”

The NFL haute couture helmets exhibit coincides with the 2014 Ole Miss Rebels football season, which includes much-anticipated home games against SEC rivals Alabama, Tennessee, Auburn and Mississippi State. The exhibit is free to the public and runs Aug. 1, 2014-Jan. 15, 2015.

The University Museum, which is celebrating 75 years of exhibitions and service to the community, is at the intersection of University Avenue and Fifth Street. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays. For more information, visit http://museum.olemiss.edu or call 662-915-7073.

For more information on the Bloomingdale’s Fashion Touchdown project, contact Katie Nida-Rovano at katie.nida-rovano@bloomingdales.com or 212-705-2443, or Jamie Frankel at jamie.frankel@bloomingdales.com or 212-705-3911.

Friends of UM Museum Prepare for Harvest Supper

Third annual event offers farm-to-table meal benefiting museum's educational programs and exhibits

Harvest Supper

The 2014 Harvest Supper will take place on October 16.

OXFORD, Miss. – Friends of the Museum is hard at work organizing the 2014 Harvest Supper, the largest annual event benefiting the University of Mississippi Museum. Scheduled for Oct. 16, the event offers a unique opportunity to build community over a meal offered on the grounds of William Faulkner’s historic home, Rowan Oak.

Proceeds from the event help support numerous aspects of the museum, including acquisitions, the “Conversations” series, exhibitions, educational programming and special events. The event also helps raise awareness about the ongoing needs to maintain and operate Rowan Oak, which is one of two historic properties managed by the museum.

“Harvest Supper is a notable event in Oxford’s annual arts and cultural calendar, and its proceeds permit the museum to continue its dynamic growth and offer a wide range of arts and educational programs for our community,” said Amy Lowe Lewis, president of the Friends of the Museum. “Support and sponsorship from community leaders and businesses allow the event to dedicate its proceeds entirely to the museum. We are grateful to everyone who takes part.”

Numerous sponsorship levels are available to businesses and individuals, each offering a variety of benefits, including name recognition in event materials, event tickets and museum memberships. More information regarding sponsorships is available by calling 662-915-7073.

The University Museum, which is celebrating 75 years of exhibition and service to the community, is at the intersection of University Avenue and Fifth Street. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays. For more information, visit http://museum.olemiss.edu or call 662-915-7073.

University Museum Gets Ready for Oxford Blues Festival

Fifth annual event features music, lectures, VIP reception for fans, scholars

5th Annual Oxford Blues Fest to be held July 17-19

5th Annual Oxford Blues Fest to be held July 17-19

OXFORD, Miss. – The fifth annual Oxford Blues Festival will take place July 17-19 on the lawn of the Walton-Young Historic House, which is adjacent to the University of Mississippi Museum. The museum will host a VIP reception Thursday night and several panel discussions on Friday.

“The museum is exceptionally pleased to continue our partnership with the Oxford Blues Festival, an annual event that enlivens our outdoor landscape and provides additional great content in its educational sessions,” said Robert Saarnio, University Museum director. “Occurring this year in conjunction with our primary summer exhibition, ‘Blues @ Home, Mississippi’s Living Blues Legends,’ the 2014 festival makes it a wonderful ‘summer of the blues’ here at the museum.”

The Jeff Jensen Band will kick off the festival with a performance Thursday at 7:15 p.m. The VIP Meet ’n’ Greet just prior to the performance will allow ticket holders to visit with the band while enjoying food inspired by blues music.

The mission of the Oxford Blues Festival is to preserve, protect and promote blues music and culture. The festival offers education, community events and workshops throughout the year, culminating with the production of an outdoor festival uniting a diverse citizenry in a celebration of American blues-based music.

Walton-Young House

Walton-Young House

“North Mississippi has a really rich blues heritage, but it doesn’t get as much attention as Chicago or the Mississippi Delta,” festival director Darryl Parker said. “This festival is a great way to bring attention to the North Mississippi music scene. Good music, fun with family and friends. It’s a reason to celebrate.”

Panel discussions featuring Mississippi blues visual artists, scholars and musicians will take place inside the University Museum, Friday, July 18, from noon until 3:30 p.m. DeWayne Moore, UM doctoral candidate in history, will moderate the panel discussions.

Festival ticket holders will have free access to Mississippi artist H.C. Porter’s “Blues @ Home” exhibit on Friday and Saturday. “Blues @ Home” is a collection of 30 portraits of Mississippi living blues legends in their at-home settings. The paintings are paired with music and oral histories collected by project manager Lauchlin Fields.

Other artists featured in the blues festival include Eric Hughes, Big Joe Shelton, The Blues Doctors, Cadillac Funk, Libby Rae Watson, Silas Reed ’N’ Da Books, the Bluez Boys, Effie Burt, Zack Tilotson, Cameran Kimbrough and The Zediker Boys.

Passes for a single day or for the entire festival are on sale now. Ticket information is available on the festival website, including discounted tickets for early purchases. Children 12 and younger can enter free of charge with an adult. Coolers are allowed for a $5 fee, but glass is not allowed inside the venue. Food vendors will be on-site. For more information, contact Darryl Parker at jdparker@oxfordbluesfest.com or visit the festival website.

The University Museum, which is celebrating 75 years of exhibitions and service to the community, is located at the intersection of University Avenue and Fifth Street. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays. For more information, visit museum.olemiss.edu or call 662-915-7073.

 

 

Registration Open for UM Museum Summer Camps

Variety of weeklong sessions provide art, education for children of all ages

SummerCamp14OXFORD, Miss. – While spring has only just begun, the University Museum is already planning ahead for summer. This year, a variety of summer camp sessions will have children traveling back in time, journeying to faraway lands and creating art inspired by their surroundings.

Camps begin the week of June 9 and continue through the week of July 28. Each session lasts one week, Monday-Friday. For family-level museum members, the fee is $50 for each weeklong camp session per participant. For nonmembers, the fee is $80. All supplies and snacks are included.

Space is limited and pre-registration is required. Parents can pick up a registration form at the museum or download a copy here.

The exciting and educational camps are inspired by the museum’s collections, including rarely-seen artifacts from the museum vault.

“The museum’s summer camp program provides a unique opportunity for children to explore their own creativity while viewing thousands of years’ worth of art and artifacts” said Emily Dean, UM Museum curator of education. “Among the most affordable in town, our summer camps promise to engage young learners while also providing hours of fun.”

From ancient civilizations to modern marvels and all points in between, each session promises new adventures, so even children who participated last year will find new experiences. Besides camp sessions for children entering grades 1 through 5, a special “Meet me at the Museum – Mini Masters” session will provide fun and learning for children ages 3 to 5, and the adults who join them. (Due to university policy, children under 5 must be accompanied by an adult.) “All About Art: Middle School Edition” will introduce children entering grades 6-8 to illustrating, painting, drawing, sculpting and more.

For more information about the museum’s 2014 Summer Camp, visit http://museum.olemiss.edu/summercamp/ or contact Emily Dean at esdean@olemiss.edu.

This year, the University Museum is celebrating 75 years of exhibition and service to the community. Located at the intersection of University Avenue and Fifth Street, the museum is open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays.

Museum to Premiere ‘Blues @ Home: Mississippi’s Living Blues Legends’

Multimedia portraits by H.C. Porter showcased with music, oral histories from influential blues talents

Blues at Home

Blues at Home

OXFORD, Miss. – The University of Mississippi Museum presents “Blues @ Home,” a collection of 30 portraits of Mississippi living blues legends in their at-home settings, all painted by H.C. Porter. The paintings are paired with oral histories, collected by project manager Lauchlin Fields and heard through handheld audio devices, to give insights into the storied lives of the legends.

Porter said she was inspired to create this project while driving through the Mississippi Delta in 2010.

“My idea was to document the living, Mississippi-born (predominately) blues legends in either their home environment, or if they no longer lived in the state, some place that was significant in their career, or had a real sense of place about Mississippi,” Porter said. “Through their personal spaces and oral histories, the legacy of the blues experience in Mississippi and the influence these legends have had on the music of the world is experienced.”

The exhibit, which opens April 1 and runs through Aug. 2, is just one part of a yearlong series of events marking the museum’s 75th anniversary. The museum, which opened as the Mary Buie Museum in 1939, is celebrating its longevity with a variety of events throughout the 2014-2015 anniversary year.

Given the rich history of blues music and culture that emanates from north Mississippi, museum director Robert Saarnio felt compelled to draw the exhibit to Oxford for its debut.

“Porter’s cultural and artistic achievement in celebrating these compelling individuals is extraordinary and beautiful,” Saarnio said. “We’re particularly proud to be the opening venue for a nationally touring exhibition, which will take the stories of our state’s music legends to audiences far and wide. It is a wonderful way to launch a series of events that will mark the museum’s 75 years of exhibition and service to the community.”

“The University of Mississippi Museum has excitedly shared my vision for the ‘Blues @ Home’ exhibition,” Porter added. “The museum grasped the impact a show of this historic content, both through the paintings and recorded oral histories, can have on fellow Mississippians. They were also eager to share it with others from around the country who, they feel, can come to understand our state in a more positive way, experiencing the contribution Mississippi has made to the arts and music of the world.”

“Blues @ Home” comes on the heels of “Backyards & Beyond,” Porter’s powerful body of 81 paintings, also accompanied by the real voices of people featured in the paintings that documented recovery one year after Hurricane Katrina ripped through Mississippi’s Gulf Coast. “Blues @ Home” continues the spirit of that exhibit, sharing stories of passion, strength and talent from the state’s deep connection to the blues.

“Hosting this exhibit is an extraordinary opportunity for the museum, as we believe it has wide appeal across Mississippi and throughout our region,” Saarnio said. “It is no small production. Multiple partners were required to make this exhibition possible, and we are profoundly grateful to the museum’s many friends and supporters for making this happen.”

To produce the exhibit, Porter and crew hit the back roads of Mississippi to interview and photograph living blues legends in their personal environments. In the company of bluesmen including Alphonso Sanders, Tommie T-Bone Pruitt, L.C. Ulmer, Jimbo Mathis and many more, they learned their sorrows, secrets, love stories, family recipes and guitar names.

Porter’s original works of art are classified as mixed media, combining painting, printmaking and photography. A high-contrast black ink image from the original photograph is transferred onto paper using silkscreen, then completed when she hand-paints using acrylic paint to add color and detail. As part of the exhibit, a video featuring the making of “Blues @ Home” will be shown on a loop.

The exhibit’s opening reception is set for 7-9 p.m. April 3, with live music from Cadillac John and Bill Abel. Both Mississippi musicians are featured in “Blues @ Home.” The reception is free and open to the public. Following the reception, there will be an “afterglow” event at Lamar Lounge in Oxford with Jimbo Mathis and other blues musicians.

The University Museum is at the intersection of University Avenue and Fifth Street. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays. General admission to this exhibition is $5, admission for seniors (62 and over) is $4 and admission for students (ages 6-17) is $3. Admission is always free for UM students, UM Museum members and children under 5. Special rates exist for tour groups wishing to visit the museum. To book a tour, contact esdean@olemiss.edu. For more information, visit http://museum.olemiss.edu or call 662-915-7073.

‘The Figure: Portrait and Symbol’ Exhibit Opens at University Museum

Works by artist Tom Corbin include paintings and bronze sculptures inspired by the female figure

Tom Corbin's new exhibit features bronze sculptures and paintings inspired by the female figure.

Tom Corbin’s new exhibit features bronze sculptures and paintings inspired by the female figure.

OXFORD, Miss. – The University of Mississippi Museum presents” The Figure: Portrait and Symbol,” featuring works by Tom Corbin. The exhibition opens Tuesday (March 18) and showcases the Kansas artist’s paintings and bronze sculptures with the female figure as his primary muse. The exhibit runs through Aug. 9.

“Corbin’s work evokes a playfulness and the details in his work are lovely and thoughtful,” said Marti Funke, the museum’s collections manager. “This exhibit shows a variety of Corbin’s talents and media.”

Born in Dayton, Ohio, in 1954, Corbin gained an early fascination with art from his mother, an art teacher by trade. Corbin studied painting and drawing at Miami University, but began his career as an advertising executive. He left the advertising industry to pursue a career in art and founded Corbin Bronze in 1986.

Corbin primarily uses the female figure and paints them in everyday intimate environments, making his paintings widely understood by his audience. Other playful elements in his works include cupcakes, poodles, diving boards and elongated ballerinas. His bronze sculptures and paintings are displayed in more than 20 showrooms and galleries internationally.

Celebrity collectors include Alec Baldwin, Jack Nicholson and Nicole Kidman. Corbin’s work has been featured on the sets of the motion pictures “True Lies,” “A Perfect Murder” and “Transformers,” among others.

An opening reception is set for 6-8 p.m. Tuesday (March 25) as part of the Oxford Arts Crawl. In conjunction with the exhibition, an artist’s lecture is slated for 7-9 p.m. Thursday (March 27). Both events are free and open to the public.

The University Museum, at the intersection of University Avenue and Fifth Street, is open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays. General admission to this special exhibition is $5, admission for seniors (62-plus) is $4 and admission for students (ages 6-17) is $3. Admission is always free for UM students, UM Museum members and children under 5. Special rates are available for tour groups wishing to visit.

To book a tour, contact esdean@olemiss.edu. For more information, visit the museum online or call 662-915-7073.