Search Results for: diversity

Department of Education Officials Praise UM Diversity Efforts

Ole Miss students share their efforts to recruit minority students and promote understanding

UM students meet with U.S. Department of Education officials to talk about how the university is creating a culture of inclusiveness. Photo by Robert Jordan/Ole Miss Communications

UM students meet with U.S. Department of Education officials to talk about how the university is creating a culture of inclusiveness. Photo by Robert Jordan/Ole Miss Communications

OXFORD, Miss. – “Impressed and moved” is how Undersecretary of Education Ted Mitchell described his reaction to a Thursday (Sept. 15) visit to the University of Mississippi.

Mitchell, a part of the U.S. Department of Education’s seventh annual back-to-school bus tour across the country, spent the morning learning about UM efforts to increase inclusion and identify the challenges universities face in creating opportunities for all students. He made his comment after talking with student leaders on the Ole Miss campus.

He met with Ole Miss administrators before joining the students for a panel discussion, which was moderated by Brandi Hephner LaBanc, UM vice chancellor for student affairs.

“It was a great honor and opportunity for Ole Miss to host the Department of Education and showcase how our administration and students embrace the tenets of the UM Creed in our diversity and inclusion efforts,” Chancellor Jeffrey Vitter said.

Following the group of students sharing their stories about the work they do on campus, Mitchell said he plans to take lessons from Ole Miss with him to pass on to other universities and also to education leaders in Washington. One particular aspect of the university’s approach stood out to him.

“One of the reasons we are here is we think Ole Miss is a place where really tough issues of race, class and gender and all kinds of identity formation are not ignored, but embraced as part of what one needs to learn as part of the college experience,” Mitchell said.

The university made news in 1962 after a deadly riot ensued following the enrollment of James Meredith, its first black student. A statue of Meredith stands near the Lyceum, where the team met Thursday.

The university’s past and its efforts to deal with issues head-on makes it an example others can follow, Mitchell said.

“We’ve been struck throughout the morning at the intentionality of the institution to be able to have eyes open, humility about the history of the institution and to build on that humility and that acknowledgement of a dark and troubled history of the institution to create an opportunity for frank dialogue,” he said.

Mitchell was joined by Kim Hunter-Reed, who serves as deputy undersecretary of education; Jaye Espy, chief of staff for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities; and Elyse Jones, confidential assistant for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

The group heard from Mississippi students from different backgrounds. They talked about working to recruit and mentor minority students, facilitate open dialogue on sensitive topics and promote understanding and tolerance.

Dylan Lewis, a senior journalism major from Tupelo, shared his story of telling family he is gay and being kicked out of his house during high school. During that difficult period, he came to Apex Leadership Summit at Ole Miss, which is for rising high school seniors.

“The love that I received from the other students that were in the program, the admissions counselors and the faculty and staff here was so great,” Lewis said. “Throughout my senior year, dealing with everything back home, they just reached out and gave me so many opportunities to get here and feel loved again. I had kind of lost that.”

Lewis became immediately active on campus once he arrived. He serves as director of student ambassadors and was an orientation leader, among other campus leadership roles. He said he’s worked to remind LGBTQ students and other minority groups that they can be heard and play important roles on campus.

“Throughout those roles, I knew what it felt like to feel unwanted and to not have a voice,” Lewis said. “Serving in those roles, I’ve tried to ensure that incoming students who are minorities know that they have a voice. You have to put yourself out there.”

Clay Wooley, a senior mechanical engineering and general studies major from Jackson, is president of Sigma Chi Fraternity and is involved with Rebels Against Sexual Assault. He talked about his fraternity’s involvement with an incident during its “Derby Day” event last spring where offensive remarks made during the program were directed toward female participants.

The incident made news and prompted public backlash against Sigma Chi.

“Most of us thought, ‘Why didn’t you do something,” Wooley said. “…. If you’re going to be part of a fraternity that has higher ideals and a part of the university that has the creed that we have, we are supposed to be different. We’re supposed to be the ones that do something.

“We failed once and we decided not to fail again.”

The university accepted the fraternity’s offer during its sanctions process to use the event as a tool to educate members, Wooley said. That approach has helped, he said. “We want to empower our men to learn and grow from this.”

The chapter is working to redesign the event and will seek input from sororities and the community.

A continuing theme of the students’ remarks was how they’ve seen campus leaders address tough issues such as the removal of the Mississippi state flag, which contains the Confederate battle flag, from campus.

They note removing the flag, which they said doesn’t embody the values of diversity and inclusion the university wants to convey, was entirely student-led. The Associated Student Body voted to remove the flag and its recommendation received the support of Faculty Senate and Staff Council before administrators followed their wishes in 2015.

Eloise Tyner, a senior public policy major from Oxford, is also an intern with the university’s William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation. One thing the university gets right when about dealing with controversy is making sure those who support the losing side of a decision aren’t marginalized, she said.

“What I love about (WWIRR’s) work is, and this is reflected at Ole Miss as well, they are very concerned with making sure the whole group moves forward, that no one is left behind, that even if you feel like your ideological argument has lost, you’re not excommunicated from the community,” Tyner said.

There’s still room for improvement and new challenges to tackle, the students said.

Aurielle “Sunny” Fowler, a sophomore psychology major from Clinton, talked about her efforts to mentor and recruit students through the university’s Mississippi Outreach to Scholastic Talent program for prospective African-American students. She was joined by her mentee, Arielle Hudson, a freshman English education major from Dundee.

The two talked about the connection they’ve formed through that program and how they believe it is crucial to bringing in the best students to the university.

Clarksdale native Espy, who serves on the Obama administration’s HBCU panel, received her bachelor’s degree from Howard University and a master’s degree from Ole Miss.

She came away impressed with the university’s climate of continuing dialogue on difficult issues.

“Ole Miss has a very storied history and past, and to share it in an honest way that the faculty, the administration and students have takes courage and a willingness to just be who you are,” Espy said. “That’s amazing to have that willingness to come from your past and create your future.”

UM Opens Search for Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Community Engagement

Committee established to find qualified candidate

Committee

A committee has been established to find UM’s vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement.

OXFORD, Miss. – The University of Mississippi is seeking to fill the new position of vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement.

This position is one of the key components of UM’s comprehensive action plan designed to foster an inclusive and welcoming environment on all its campuses. The action plan was announced in August 2014, and an earlier search to find a candidate for this position was unsuccessful.

Renewing the effort to hire UM’s first vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement is among Chancellor Jeff Vitter’s top priorities, he said.

“As key components of the UM Creed, the values of diversity and multiculturalism are core to the University of Mississippi community,” said Vitter, who became chancellor on Jan. 1. “I share that strong commitment to diversity.

“For that reason, my first major administrative action is to launch the search for vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement. We will recruit an outstanding leader to partner with people and units throughout the university in creating a welcoming and inclusive multicultural environment for all students, faculty and staff.”

Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Morris Stocks has established a search committee to oversee this effort to find the person who will serve as the university’s chief diversity officer.

Once hired, the new vice chancellor will report to Stocks.

Don Cole, assistant to the chancellor for multicultural affairs, assistant provost and associate professor of mathematics, has served as the university’s chief diversity officer since 2003. Cole joined UM in 1993 and was recognized in 2003 with the Frist Student Service Award.

Vitter and Stocks expressed appreciation to Cole for his leadership and steadfast commitment to enhancing the campus climate for all.

“Don Cole has shown a remarkable talent first for listening carefully to the concerns of a wide array of individuals, and then working cooperatively with many people and programs within the university, our community and the state to effect positive change within our university,” Stocks said.

Vitter also praised Cole for his impact at UM.

“We are deeply grateful to Don Cole for helping our university make important progress in creating an inclusive and welcoming environment for all,” Vitter said.

Among the responsibilities of the new vice chancellor will be to engage in efforts to address issues of race and diversity at UM. This vice chancellor will also work with other existing campus organizations that focus on these issues, Stocks said.

Brandi Hephner LaBanc, vice chancellor for student affairs, will serve as chair of the search committee.

Other members of the search committee are Tony Ammeter, Michael Barnett, Alice Clark, Don Cole, Derek Cowherd, Sandra Cox-McCarty, Phillis George, Susan Glisson, Maria Gondo, Sue Grayzel, Carl Hill, Andrea Jekabsons, Linda Keena, Shawnboda Mead, Chase Moore, Sathyanarayana Murthy, Albert Nylander, Rachna Prakash, Sujith Ramachandran, Evangeline Robinson, Jocelyn Tipton and Ryan Upshaw.

“I feel privileged to lead the committee that will identify and recommend a strong leader for this critically important campus role,” Hephner LaBanc said. “Numerous committee members from the earlier process have returned to serve during this search process. I know, without any doubt, they will remain highly engaged and work diligently to seek out an individual who will bring immense talent and passion to our great university.”

To assist the search committee, a firm will be hired to recruit qualified candidates.

Once the search is open, information will be available on the Office of the Provost’s Web page.

NCAA Honors Jones, Bjork with New Diversity Awards

Recognition is first of its kind to be awarded by NCAA

Outgoing UM Chancellor Dan Jones, Carver Phillips and family, Coach Billy Brewer and Ole Miss AD Ross Bjork pose with the that will be posted along Chucky Mullins Drive.  Photo by Kevin Bain/Ole Miss Communications

Outgoing UM Chancellor Dan Jones, Carver Phillips and family, Coach Billy Brewer and Ole Miss AD Ross Bjork pose with the sign that will be posted along Chucky Mullins Drive. Photo by Kevin Bain/Ole Miss Communications

A new NCAA initiative recognizing individuals who support diversity and inclusion has selected outgoing UM Chancellor Dan Jones and UM Athletics Director Ross Bjork as its first honorees.

The NCAA announced the awards Wednesday in the following release:

An NCAA committee is introducing a new initiative to spotlight individuals who are working to support the interests of ethnic minorities and other underrepresented populations.

The Champions of Diversity and Inclusion recognition was created by the Minority Opportunities and Interests Committee, comprised of athletics directors, faculty members, college athletes and others affiliated with NCAA member schools. The committee is Association-wide, which means it is not affiliated with an NCAA division but instead deals with issues relevant to the entire NCAA.

The first individuals whose work will be highlighted by the program are both from the University of Mississippi. Both Jones and Bjork worked as part of the university’s efforts to modernize and add historical context to cultural symbols on the Mississippi campus.

Specifically, Jones last year announced a comprehensive action plan for fostering an environment of inclusion on the Mississippi campus. In it, he outlined plans to create a vice chancellor-level position for diversity and inclusion and rename a campus street called Confederate Drive. Bjork, meanwhile, has supported these initiatives from an athletics perspective, including naming a space in an athletics facility after the first two black football players at Mississippi.

China Jude, chair of the committee and athletics director at Queens College in New York, said the committee seeks “athletics administrators of influence, who have provided significant support to underrepresented populations,” including ethnic minorities, the disabled, and the LGBTQ community.

UM AD Ross Bjork, UM Chancellor Dan Jones, Archie Manning, and executive vice president of Market Development and Corporate Communications for FedEx Corp. Mike Glenn at today's press conference announcing Bjork's move to Ole Miss. Photo by UM Photographer Kevin Bain

UM AD Ross Bjork, UM Chancellor Dan Jones, Archie Manning, and executive vice president of Market Development and Corporate Communications for FedEx Corp. Mike Glenn. Photo by UM Photographer Kevin Bain

Those recognized as Champions of Diversity and Inclusion have created opportunities for those in underrepresented populations to advance into senior leadership positions; demonstrated longevity or consistency in their support; or initiated or coordinated cultural change in an athletics department or at an NCAA member school in matters related to college sports.

Jude announced the initiative in conjunction with Bernard Franklin, NCAA chief inclusion officer and executive vice president of education and community engagement.

“We believe that it is important to identify individuals who are making sincere efforts to support underrepresented populations,” Franklin and Jude said in a letter to its first honorees. “Your stance … speaks volumes to the current social climate in which we live. We understand that your process will be long and challenging; however, it is necessary as this country grows more ethnically diverse.”

Danielle Sims Awarded Mereese Ladson Diversity Scholarship

Recipient hopes to gain new insights for her work in UM student housing

Danielle Sims

Danielle Sims

OXFORD, Miss. – Danielle Sims, area coordinator at the University of Mississippi, is a 2015 recipient of the Mereese Ladson Diversity Scholarship, which is given by the National Association of College Auxiliary Services.

Sims, who works in the Department of Student Housing, said she’s looking forward to gaining new ideas and learning about resources through the scholarship that will benefit the university.

“I am honored and excited to receive this scholarship and represent the Department of Student Housing here at the University of Mississippi at NACAS,” Sims said. “This scholarship will allow me the opportunity to attend any NACAS conference of my choice, and I will be sure to return to campus with ideas and resources on how we can add to operational quality and use best practices in regards to auxiliary services.” 

The Mereese Ladson Diversity Scholarship was established in 2005 in honor of the late Mereese Ladson, controller at Brooklyn College in Brooklyn, New York. Ladson was a president and longtime leader of NACAS, and the scholarship is intended to further her work to promote the advancement of diverse, career-minded higher education professionals. Sims was honored with the award, along with Gino Galutera, director of auxiliary technology at The Citadel.

NACAS, headquartered in Charlottesville, Virginia, is a nonprofit higher education association serving auxiliary services, student support services and ancillary services professionals at two- and four-year colleges and universities in the United States, Canada and around the world. NACAS provides opportunities for members to share ideas, develop business solutions, enhance programs and revenues, and develop meaningful professional relationships.

Sims is an important part of UM’s Student Housing team and is very deserving of the honor, said Lionel Maten, director of student housing and assistant vice chancellors for student affairs.

“I am proud for Danielle and all the hard work she put into receiving this honor,” Maten said. “It is my person belief that NACAS provides quality educational opportunities to its member institutions and continues to add value in preparing our next generation of senior auxiliary services professionals. I know Danielle will return from NACAS ready to further move students toward their potential.”

Jennifer Kirby-McLemore Named Inaugural Diversity Award Recipient

Honor is presented by UM Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Director of Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement Shawnboda Deanne Mead, Meek School of Journalism Dean Will Norton, Diversity Award Recipient Jennifer Kirby-McLemore and Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Brandi Hephner LeBanc.

Shawnboda Mead (left), UM journalism Dean Will Norton and Brandi Hephner LaBanc (right) congratulate award recipient Jennifer Kirby-McLemore.

OXFORD, Miss. – University of Mississippi law student Jennifer Kirby-McLemore has been named the recipient of the inaugural Treadway P. and Mark D. Strickland Diversity Award for her efforts to promote diversity and inclusion on campus and throughout the community.

The award is presented by the university’s Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement.

Kirby-McLemore has devoted much of her time to diversity awareness. As a law student, she has interned with the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation; is president of OUTLaw, an organization on campus with the focus of promoting awareness of LGBT legal issues; and has worked as a student lawyer with the Mississippi Innocence Project.

Her community service work has included teaching biology and science at three underprivileged schools in north Mississippi, volunteering with the UM law school’s Pro Bono Initiative with the Family Law Clinic and LGBT Documents clinic, and, before law school, volunteering for the Coldwater Methodist Church Food Pantry.

“I never thought that all the various activities I am involved in would culminate into this,” Kirby-McLemore said. “I just felt compelled to help when and where I can – to give a voice to those who cannot speak for themselves or provide an echo for those already advocating for themselves.”

She has earned numerous recognitions for her academic achievements and work to promote diversity.

“It was certainly encouraging to read about the outstanding diversity-related activities that all of the applicants had experienced,” said Shawnboda Mead, director of the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement. “As the inaugural recipient of the scholarship award, Jennifer Kirby-McLemore stood out among others as she exemplified the characteristics that Mark and Tread Strickland were hoping for. I am beyond grateful to Mark and Tread for their generous gift and the impact they’ll have on students for years to come.

“My hope is that students will be inspired to take advantage of even more opportunities to increase their involvement in diversity and inclusion initiatives.”

The purpose of the award is to assist a deserving undergraduate or graduate student committed to promoting diversity awareness and acceptance in continuing their education at the university.

“The vision of the Strickland Diversity Award is to assist a student who exemplifies a commitment to diversity awareness, inclusiveness and respect and to bettering our university community,” said Brandi Hephner LaBanc, vice chancellor for student affairs. “I am very grateful for Tread and Mark, as they have created a support unit for students on our campus. Their generous scholarship will allow many future students to commit themselves to pursuing a campus atmosphere that encourages dignity and respect.”

UM Announces Plan for Leadership on Issues of Race and Diversity

Chancellor releases report on campus environment, creates new position of vice chancellor for diversity

OXFORD, Miss. – University of Mississippi Chancellor Dan Jones has released a comprehensive action plan for fostering a more inclusive and welcoming environment on campus.

The recommendations are the fruit of a study of wide-ranging opinions on campus culture from students, faculty and administrators, which were paired with input from respected consultants. The plan includes a new position of vice chancellor for diversity and a variety of initiatives focused on inclusion and race relations.

Last summer, an expanded Sensitivity and Respect Committee completed its review of the university’s environment on race and diversity. After the committee’s report, consultants Ed Ayers and Christy Coleman of Richmond, Virginia, were brought in to study the effect on campus culture of building names and campus symbols tied to historical issues of slavery and segregation. Consultant Greg Vincent, who led the University of Texas in addressing issues of diversity and inclusion, was hired to analyze the university’s organizational structure and how it relates to diversity and inclusion.

The consultants submitted reports on their interviews with members of the campus community, as well as recommendations based on their experiences with similar issues. Jones complimented the work of the university community and consultants in generating the ideas included in the action plan.

“The reports from everyone involved were candid and thoughtful in suggesting that more can be done here to improve our environment for diversity and inclusion,” Jones said.

“It is my hope that the steps outlined here – reflecting the hard work of university committees and our consultants – will prove valuable in making us a stronger and healthier university, bringing us closer to our goal of being a warm and welcoming place for every person every day, regardless of race, religious preference, country of origin, ability, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation or gender expression.”

Jones said he knows that some people will find parts of the recommendations that they like and some they don’t. “Every idea was not included, but I’m confident everyone involved will find evidence of their substantial contributions.

“There were and will continue to be differences of opinion among us. But, I am encouraged that while our discussions over recent months were frank, even tough, they also were civil and respectful. My very sincere thanks go out to all of those who demonstrated these values throughout the process.”

The process was designed to gather as broad a range of opinion as possible, the chancellor said.

“It was important that we hear from everyone who loves this university,” he said. “Too often when viewpoints are wide-ranging, nuanced and emotional, the easy answer for leaders is a non-decision, freezing people at a point in time and putting progress off to another day. To me, that is not leadership. And our mission as a university is to lead.”

The plan involves six steps, with more initiatives expected when the new vice chancellor position is filled:

1. Create a vice chancellor-level position for diversity and inclusion. UM’s provost will create a specific position title, portfolio, set of responsibilities and initial budget for a new administrative position. The job will be created after consultation with faculty and will be subject to approval by the university’s governing board. A search committee will be formed to begin work during the fall semester.

2. Establish a portfolio model of diversity and engagement. As part of the creation of the job description for the new vice chancellor position, a set of standards for diversity and engagement will be drafted for the university to follow moving forward.

3. Deal squarely with the issue of race while also addressing other dimensions of diversity.

“We look forward to a day when it is the norm to embrace and celebrate our differences, when our country and state have become a truly post-racial society,” Jones said. “But that day has not yet arrived. Clearly, there are still issues regarding race that our country must address. And we will need to continue a dialogue on race at our university. Our unique history regarding race provides not only a larger responsibility for providing leadership on race issues, but also a large opportunity – one we should and will embrace.”

A faculty group focused on UM’s history with slavery began work last year. The initiative is an example of the kind of scholarly leadership UM can provide on the issue, Jones said, voicing renewed commitment to the work of the university’s William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation. He also said the new vice chancellor for diversity will be engaged in efforts to address issues of race and diversity and will work with existing campus organizations, such as the Critical Race Studies Group, that have focused on these issues.

4. Implement a symbolic and formal dedication of all new students to the ideals of inclusion and fairness to which UM is devoted.

The UM Creed was adopted as a means of communicating and cultivating the university’s core values. A public university can’t require a pledge or oath as a condition of enrollment. It can and will work with students and others to pursue methods of elevating and strengthening the UM community with the creed’s values. The university’s vice chancellor for student affairs will implement this recommendation.

5. Offer more history, putting the past into context, telling more of the story of Mississippi’s struggles with slavery, secession, segregation and their aftermath. 

Consultants cited Richmond, one of capitals of the Confederacy, as a good example of appropriately addressing a negative history. City leaders opted not to erase history, even some of the more difficult parts of it, and chose not to remove existing statues and building names. Instead, the city has balanced its presentation of history by offering broader, contemporary context for symbols and adding new symbols more representative of the city’s current culture.

An example of that approach already implemented at UM is the statue honoring James Meredith, the university’s first African-American student. Additional opportunities with more contemporary symbols lie ahead, and the new vice chancellor will be engaged in long-term evaluation of those recommendations. Until the new vice chancellor is hired, that job will be handled by the provost and the assistant to the chancellor for multicultural affairs.

Among buildings and symbols that will be evaluated for plaques adding context and perspective are Vardaman Hall, the ballroom in Johnson Commons and the Confederate statue at the entrance to Lyceum Circle.

Several steps have been taken already:

– The entrance of the Manning Center was recently designated the Williams-Reed Foyer in honor of Ben Williams and James Reed, the university’s first two black football players. Jones thanked Athletics Director Ross Bjork and head football coach Hugh Freeze for their leadership in the recommendation.

– The new Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement opens this fall in Stewart Hall. The center, which will move later to the renovated and expanded Student Union, enhances the quantity and quality of programming and leadership initiatives for underrepresented students.

– Coliseum Drive will need a new name when the Tad Smith Coliseum is replaced with the new basketball arena. A recommendation from the UM Alumni Association and the M-Club to rename it “Roy Lee ‘Chucky’ Mullins Drive” has been adopted. Mullins, a black football player who was paralyzed and later died, became a unifying symbol of an indomitable human spirit at the university.

– Confederate Drive, which enters Fraternity Row, will be renamed “Chapel Lane.”

6. Appropriate use of the name “Ole Miss.” UM’s longstanding nickname is beloved by the vast majority of its students and alumni. But a few, especially some university faculty, are uncomfortable with it. Some don’t want it used at all and some simply don’t want it used within the academic context.

The university completed a national study about the name “Ole Miss” during the last year and found the vast majority of respondents don’t attach any meaning to it other than an affectionate name for the university. In fact, a significant margin likes and prefers the “Ole Miss” name. And a very small percentage of respondents associate the university, either as “Ole Miss” or “University of Mississippi,” with negative race issues.

Both names will be used in appropriate contexts going forward, with particular emphasis going to “Ole Miss” in athletics and as a representation of the university’s spirit.

Other campus efforts already in place will continue to grow 

The action plan includes a wide variety of other initiatives launched even as the study of campus environment was underway, including creation of the Bias Incident Response Team, diversity training for employees, construction of a National Pan-Hellenic Council garden representing the history and campus engagement of historically black fraternities and sororities, periodic surveys to monitor the campus environment, and various programs to enhance student success.

Walgreens Helps UM Faculty Open Students’ Eyes to Pharmacy Profession, Increase Diversity

… Murrah and Bailey Magnet high schools participate in program

Two Jackson high school students participate in a laboratory exercise under the direction of Kris Harrell, director of professional experience programs and associate professor of pharmacy practice in the UM School of Pharmacy.

With funding from Walgreens, the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy is continuing an initiative that is dramatically increasing diversity among its student body.

The funds enable the school to provide students at Jackson’s Murrah High School and Bailey Magnet High School with opportunities to learn about the pharmacy profession and to allocate a scholarship to one of those students. This is the third consecutive year that Walgreens has provided support for the program.

“It’s of tremendous value to have the opportunity to enhance diversity in our profession within the state,” said Chris McLaurin, pharmacy supervisor for Walgreens. “It’s wonderful to have local students interested in our profession and to remain in-state. It benefits everyone.”Read the story …

Journalism Student, Faculty Member Recognized for Diversity Efforts

University of Mississippi journalism lecturer Robin Street and members of her student committee received a second honor in a month for their Diversity Rocks campaign. Street received the faculty Diversity Award and public policy major Ray Mays received the student Diversity Award at the annual Black and White Affair. The student committee members received special certificates. Pictured, left to right are (front row) student committee members Ignacio Murillo and Molly Jarabica, along with student winner Mays. Back row: Kaylen Addison, ASB director of diversity affairs, who presented the awards, stands with committee member Jajuan McNeil, Street and committee member Kristie Warino.

OXFORD, Miss. – For the second time in a month, a University of Mississippi journalism faculty member has been honored for her commitment to diversity, along with a student who is working to promote racial dialogue at Ole Miss.

Robin Street, lecturer in journalism who specializes in teaching public relations classes, received the faculty Diversity Award for a campaign she created called “Diversity Rocks” for the Meek School of Journalism and New Media. “Diversity Rocks” celebrated diversity, whether through ethnic origin, sexual orientation or disability, with an emphasis on anti-bullying. Street was aided by a 14-member committee of public relations students who were also recognized at the award ceremony.Ray Mays, a public policy major from Darling, Miss., received the student Diversity Award for his work with One Mississippi, a student coalition that promotes social integration. As director of dialogue for the group, Mays organizes dialogue meetings between members of different races and cultures to ensure every student feels welcomed and respected.

“The selfless work that Robin and Ray have done to promote diversity in their roles as faculty and student has not gone unnoticed and the selection committee members felt that their hard work should be acknowledged and celebrated,” said Valeria Beasley Ross, assistant dean of students for multicultural affairs and volunteer services.
Read the story …

Clarion Ledger: Census shows diversity grows in Miss.

UM professor quoted on the results of the latest Census.

Solo Theater Performance, Workshop Oct. 16 Mark LGBT History, Diversity Awareness

OXFORD, Miss. – A monodrama performance and workshop on documentary theater are scheduled Oct. 16 at the University of Mississippi to recognize October as LGBT (Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender) History Month and National Diversity Awareness Month. The events are free to the public.

Read the story …