Search Results for: graduate school

Chemical Engineering Graduates Admitted to Medical, Dental Schools

Cary Roy and David Langford headed to UMMC and Columbia University, respectively

Cary Roy has been accepted into the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Submitted photo

As the spring semester ended, many University of Mississippi engineering students began working at various companies throughout the country. Others anticipated pursuing graduate school. And some students, including Cary Roy and David Langford, have chosen to take their problem-solving skills into the field of medicine.

Roy, of Moss Point, and Langford, of Atlanta, have been accepted into medical school and dental school, respectively. Both completed their chemical engineering degrees in May.

Increasingly, engineering students are seeking careers in medicine as the medical field becomes increasingly driven by technology. The addition of a biomedical engineering degree at Ole Miss likely will continue the trend of students seeking engineering degrees as a pathway to medical careers.

“I would have considered pursuing the newly created biomedical engineering degree if it had been available when I chose to enroll here from the Mississippi School of Math and Science four years ago,” Roy said. “I believe that the new program will benefit future students considering careers in medicine.”

But the pre-medicine track offered through chemical engineering worked best for Langford, who was admitted to Columbia University’s College of Dental Medicine. He plans to pursue a doctorate in dental surgery.

His interest in following a path to medical school was a result of his interest in both chemistry and mathematics. Chemical engineering allowed Langford to study both concepts.

“Being raised with parents and grandparents who worked in health care, I wanted a degree that would allow me to explore all of my interests,” he said. “I found an intriguing parallel between the fields of dentistry and engineering during my undergraduate studies.”

Roy was admitted to the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson. He, too, felt that a chemical engineering degree seemed like the perfect combination of challenge and interest.

Roy developed an interest in attending medical school to find a career path that allowed him to help others.

David Langford has been accepted into the Doctor of Dental Surgery program at Columbia University. Submitted photo

“My engineering background greatly benefits me as I prepare to attend medical school in the fall,” he said. “It has given me a unique set of skills that are flexible and useful in a variety of areas, including medicine.”

Both Langford and Roy are graduates of the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College and completed research towards a senior thesis.

Langford’s thesis focused on “Development of Standard Operating Procedure: Admicellar Polymerization of Polystyrene Thin Film (AIBN) on Polysciences 30-50µm Glass Beads Using Cetyltrimethyl-Ammonium Bromide Surfactant.” He worked with Adam Smith, assistant professor of chemical engineering, and John O’Haver, professor and chair of chemical engineering, to complete his project.

Roy worked with Wei-Yei Chen, professor of chemical engineering, to conduct his research on “The Effects of Ultrasonic and Photochemical Pretreatment on Heating Value and Carbon Capturing Ability of Fast Pyrolysis-Derived Biochars.”

Besides Roy’s work on an Honors thesis, he completed a clinical shadowing program at UMMC that allowed him to observe and shadow physicians working in the anesthesiology and family medicine departments. For Roy, this experience was important in his commitment to the medical field.

“This up-close-and-personal experience with medicine strengthened my desire to attend medical school as it showed me how doctors practice their craft and use their skills to help those in need,” he said. “I also believe that the experience proved to be valuable on my medical school applications.”

Similarly, Langford believes that two summer internships with the U.S. Olympic Committee enhanced his applications for dental school. During his internship in Colorado, he worked with USOC physicians, clinicians, physical therapists and other staff in a variety of medical treatments that the Olympic and Paralympic athletes required.

Outside the classroom, both Roy and Langford were involved in a variety of activities. Langford was a member of Delta Psi fraternity, Engineering Ambassadors and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He also was selected for membership in Omicron Delta Kappa society, Tau Beta Pi and Phi Kappa Phi.

Roy was a member of Tau Beta Pi, AIChE and Engineering Ambassadors. He also served on the Engineering Student Body Leadership Council and was an officer in the American Medical Student Association.

In the future, Roy hopes to work in a public hospital in Mississippi and open a free clinic to provide basic medical services to underprivileged and underserved people. Langford’s plans include postdoctoral residencies in orthodontics, maxillofacial surgery or general dentistry.

Meek School Faculty Member, Graduates Earn Honors from PR Association

Robin Street lauded for lifetime achievement; UM Communications wins Best in Show for PR projects

Street SPRF PRO

Kristina Hendrix (right), president of the Southern Public Relations Federation, presents UM lecturer Robin Street with a framed certificate and medallion. Street received the group’s Professional Achievement Award, its highest honor for lifetime achievement. Photo by Leo Ridge, Big Top Photo Booth

OXFORD, Miss. – A faculty member from the University of Mississippi’s Meek School of Journalism and New Media has been presented the highest award for lifetime achievement given by the Southern Public Relations Federation.

Also, graduates of the Meek School working in the University Communications office won Best in Show, the top award in the competition for public relations projects, along with multiple other awards.

Robin Street, lecturer in the Meek School of Journalism and New Media, was honored with the Professional Achievement Award. The recipient is chosen from among professionals representing SPRF-member states. Each nominee had previously received his or her state association’s Professional Award. Street represented the Public Relations Association of Mississippi.

In 2009, Street was named Educator of the Year by both PRAM and SPRF. Although it is rare for an educator to receive the professional award, the judges, who remain anonymous, commented, “Ms. Street’s achievements are stellar. She is innovative in her field. She is continually engaged in professional development. Her awards and accomplishments are well above what would be outstanding.”

Toni Richardson, SPRF vice president for professional development, oversaw the competition.

“As I read through each of the nominee biographies, I was impressed with each of them,” Richardson said. “However, my thoughts kept coming back to Robin and what an incredible teacher, educator, mentor, friend and inspiration she is. Our judges scored Robin a perfect 100 percent.”

Street is a “charismatic and determined public relations practitioner who truly embodies the qualities for which this awards stands,” SPRF President Kristina Hendrix said.

Will Norton Jr., professor and dean of the Meek School of Journalism and New Media, has watched Street’s career evolve.

“For decades, Robin Street has been demonstrating the best practices of public relations and teaching those practices in the classroom,” Norton said. “It is only appropriate that her uncommon excellence should be recognized in this way. Clearly, students in the Meek School have long recognized the quality of Ms. Street’s professionalism.”

Hendrix presented the award to Street Sept. 16 at the association’s annual conference in New Orleans. Also presented at the banquet were Lantern Awards for public relations projects in multiple categories. Awards are given at three levels. A Lantern is the highest award, followed by an Award of Excellence, then a Certificate of Merit.

The University Communications office, led by Meek School graduate Danny Blanton, director of public relations, won Best in Show chosen from all categories, and a Lantern in their category for a communications program on parking changes at Ole Miss. Graduates Lindsey Abernathy, former communications specialist; Ryan Whittington, assistant director of public relations for social media strategy; and William Hamilton, public relations assistant, were key in creating that program.

Abernathy also won a Certificate of Merit for the Inside Ole Miss newsletter. Communication specialists Edwin Smith and Michael Newsom won a Certificate of Merit and an Award of Excellence, respectively, for news releases.

Street won a Lantern in her category of communication programs, as well as an Award of Excellence for writing and a Certificate of Merit for PR tactics.

For more information on the Meek School of Journalism and New Media, visit http://meek.olemiss.edu or email MeekSchool@olemiss.edu.

ChE Graduate Staying at UM for Law School

Sneed seeking juris doctor and career with successful firm

Sneed

Lindsey Sneed

At a time when many University of Mississippi engineering graduates are securing their first position with an engineering company or pursuing graduate work in their fields, Lindsey Sneed of Jonesboro, Arkansas, is taking a different route.

Sneed, who graduated in May with a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering, is staying in Oxford to begin studies at the UM School of Law, where she received a generous scholarship.

After considering the University of Arkansas for her undergraduate work, Sneed chose to attend the Ole Miss because of the opportunities available through the School of Engineering and the affordability of the university. She is confident that her engineering school experience will be beneficial as she pursues her law degree.

“Being a student in the School of Engineering has taught me a completely different way to approach and solve problems,” Sneed said. “Reasoning skills are key to the successful practice of law, and I feel that the Ole Miss School of Engineering has taught me that there is no problem too big or too hard.”

Sneed’s short-term goals include completing her law degree and passing the bar exam. She would also like to live in a larger city (such as Nashville, Tennessee) and join a reputable firm with an environmental or intellectual property practice. Ultimately, Sneed hopes to become a law firm partner or begin her own practice.

As an undergraduate, she has developed a passion for environmental engineering. She participated in a study abroad program at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom that focused on the field. She said she believes that the increasing interest in sustainable energy practices will lead to new technological advancements that require patent protection.

“While abroad at Leeds, I learned a lot about alternative energy, as well as the practicality and feasibility of different types of energy: solar, hydro, tidal, and wind power,” Sneed said. “The use of biomass as a fuel source was also touched upon.

“It was very interesting to analyze climate trends, and then discuss the different ways to try and fix some of the damage we’ve done over the past few decades. It was very much an ‘engineering’ approach to climate change.”

During her time outside of class, Sneed was involved with the Associated Student Body, Alpha Omicron Pi sorority and Mock Trial, and she served as treasurer of the Society of Women Engineers. She credits John O’Haver, director of UM’s Center for Mathematics and Science Education and professor of chemical engineering; and Peter Sukanek, professor of chemical engineering, for their mentoring and advice during her undergraduate experience.

Five Oxford High School Graduates Receive UM’s Highest Academic Award

OXFORD, Miss. – Five Oxford residents are among 59 University of Mississippi students to receive a 2013 Taylor Medal, the university’s highest academic award. The outstanding students were recognized recently during the 70th annual Honors Convocation at the Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts.

They are seniors Jacqueline Grace Boyce, Samuel Liyang Di, Laura Jansen, Elyse Cosette Jensen and Alexandria Nicole Tidwell. Boyce, Jensen and Tidwell are slated for graduation May 11. Di and Jansen are scheduled to complete their degrees in May 2014.

Boyce is a senior international studies and German major in the College of Liberal Arts. She is a member of UM’s Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College and Croft Institute for International Studies. Her other honors include membership in Phi Beta Kappa, UM’s highest academic honor in the liberal arts. She is a Croft Scholar and recipient of the Milden Language Award.

Di is a senior electrical engineering major in the School of Engineering. A member of the Honors College, he received the Eta Kappa Nu Outstanding Junior Engineer Award.

Jansen received the Taylor Medal as a senior hospitality management major in the School of Applied Sciences. She is also majoring in art in the College of Liberal Arts. Her other honors include listing on the Chancellor’s Honor Roll and receiving the Student Art Association Award.

Jensen is a senior physics major in the pre-med curriculum. A member of the Honors College, she is listed on the Chancellor’s Honor Roll. Her other honors include membership in Phi Beta Kappa and in Phi Kappa Phi, UM’s highest academic honor across all disciplines. She is a certified veterinary assistant.

Tidwell is a senior English major in the College of Liberal Arts. Her other honors include the W. Alton Bryant Award and AAUW Sarah Robinson Scholarship.

Taylor Medals recognize no more than 0.45 percent of undergraduates for meritorious scholarship and deportment. Recipients of the award must have at least a 3.90 grade-point average. The award was established at Ole Miss in 1904 by Dr. William A. Taylor of Booneville in memory of his son, an honored 1871 alumnus of the university.

UM Education Graduate Student Helps Rebuild Smithville School Library One Book at a Time

Application completed for class project lands $15,000 grant

Kerry Baker, librarian at Smithville High School, and school principal Chad "Coach" O'Brian show off the oversize check from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation. UM photo by Jerra Scott.

OXFORD, Miss. – After an EF-5 tornado demolished the town of Smithville in April 2011, many citizens did not know where to begin to rebuild what was left of the lives they once knew.

For Kerry Baker, librarian at Smithville High School and an online graduate student at the University of Mississippi, one step toward recovery was landing a Beyond Words: Dollar General School Library Relief Fund grant worth $15,000 for the school where she has taught for 24 years.

“I was able to pursue the grant as part of my literacy classes,” explained Baker, who is earning a master’s degree in literacy education from UM. “The tornado wiped out the school. Right now, we’re on a temporary campus until August of 2013.”

The relief fund was created by Dollar General to help libraries recovering from major disasters. This grant will help provide replacement items, including books, media and equipment, that were destroyed by the violent storm that left the school unusable. In the library, the tornado did significant damage, shifting the roof and destroying literacy materials, including more than 800 books.Read the story …

Business School Doctoral Candidate Honored as Top Graduate Instructor

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Laura Williams

OXFORD,
Miss. – The accolades for Laura Williams resemble that of a Hollywood
blockbuster. “Engaging.” “Inspirational.” “Brilliant.”

A
graduate instructor in the University of Mississippi School of Business
Administration, Williams reaps such acclaim from her students, and the
praises haven’t gone unnoticed. She was recently honored with the
university’s 2008-09 Graduate Instructor/Teaching Assistant Award.

“Ms.
Williams truly is a remarkable teacher worthy of this prestigious
honor,” said Joi Todd, a sophomore business major from Jackson. “I
nominated her for the award because of the kindness, patience and
excellence exhibited both in her teaching style and personal conduct.”

“Ms.
Williams exemplifies amazing qualities,” said Katherine Sneed, a junior
accounting major from Jackson. “Within the first class, she knew each
and every one of our names. I’ve never had a teacher so eager to know
all of their students.”

A doctoral degree candidate in
organizational behavior in the UM business school, Williams said she
was thankful to receive the honor, sometimes called the Apple Award,
from UM’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. The award
includes a $1,000 prize.

Read the story …

Spring Ole Miss Graduate Coaches Surprise Winner of State’s High School Latin Exam


The poverty-stricken Mississippi Delta community of Hollandale might seem like an unlikely place to find a rising Latin program, but it is home to this year’s winner of the Magnolia State’s high school Latin examination.

Led by Mississippi Teacher Corps participant Austin Walker, an English teacher who graduates Saturday with a master’s in curriculum and instruction from the University of Mississippi, students at Simmons High School studied Latin this academic year for the first time in school history. The work paid off as Alexis Hicks, a 15-year-old sophomore, outscored students from established programs to take first place on the statewide high school Latin exam.

School of Pharmacy Graduates Post 100 Percent Pass Rate on Licensure Exam

OXFORD, Miss. – This year’s Doctor of Pharmacy graduates at
the University of Mississippi have posted a 100 percent
pass rate on their first attempt at the North American
Pharmacist Licensure Examination.

 

Read the story …

New UM Graduates Begin Tenure-track Appointments Across the South

Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management sends six students into faculty positions

The 2018 doctoral graduates from the UM Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management include (from left) J. Grant Mouser, Samuel Buckner, Matthew Jessee, Kevin Mattox, Robert Davis, Sam Wilson, Charles Caleb Williams and Vokay Addoh. UM photo by Sarah Sapp

OXFORD, Miss. – During Commencement ceremonies earlier this month at the University of Mississippi, the Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management celebrated a record number of health and kinesiology doctoral students walking across the graduation stage directly into full-time, tenure-track appointments across the South.

“We had a remarkable group of nine doctoral students hooded this year,” said Allison Ford-Wade, professor and graduate program coordinator. “Of those, seven of the nine have accepted tenure-track faculty positions and one is pursuing a second doctoral program.”

Vokay Addoh, of Port Harcourt, Nigeria, was invited to join UM’s own faculty. Samuel Buckner, of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, will join the faculty of the University of South Florida. Matt Jessee, of Claremont, North Carolina, accepted a position at the University of Southern Mississippi.

J. Grant Mouser, of Norman, Oklahoma, will begin his new appointment at Troy University in August. Charles Caleb Williams, of Lake Butler, Florida, will join the faculty at LaGrange College in Georgia. Sam Wilson, of Senatobia, will begin his tenure at Georgia Southern University.

Finally, Robert Davis, a December graduate, joined the University of Arkansas as an assistant professor of public health in January.

When you ask these students what attracted them to Ole Miss, their answers have a common thread: a talented, dedicated faculty and administration, the beautiful campus and all the resources that come along with studying at a flagship research university with Carnegie R1 status, indicating the highest research activity.

For Addoh, the prevalent health disparities in Mississippi and the need for health care professionals were another important aspect of his decision to join the program. His dissertation examined a potential method to enhance the positive experience of exercise, an area of health behavior research with potential ramifications for physical activity promotion.

“Moving forward, I intend to extend my inquiry on methods to enhance the experience of exercise and to further contribute to the science on physical activity translational research,” Addoh said.

Addoh credits Paul Loprinzi, associate professor of health, exercise science and recreation management, for his mentorship throughout the doctoral program.

Loprinzi not only is highly regarded by students for his caring mentorship, but he is one of the department’s most prolific publishers. Having published 73 peer-reviewed papers in 2017 alone, Loprinzi’s work has been cited more than 5,000 times since 2011.

Under Loprinzi’s direction, Addoh added 26 scholarly articles to his list of published works.

The potential to work alongside an intensely productive researcher drew Buckner, Jessee and Mouser to Ole Miss as well, specifically to study skeletal muscle adaptations to resistance exercise with Jeremy Loenneke, assistant professor of health, exercise science and recreation management and director of the Kevser Ermin Applied Physiology Laboratory, affectionately called the Ole Miss Muscle lab.

Jessee, who accrued 40 publications while at UM, explained that it was Loenneke’s passion for science and ability to prepare students for success that drew him to stay for his Ph.D.

“I felt that I could learn so much more from him than going elsewhere, because he is always pushing people to think critically and not just align with the status quo,” said Jessee, who will continue studying skeletal muscle health and function in his new research faculty role. He will be searching for new ways to attenuate muscle function loss due to aging and immobilization or injury.

While Mouser counts producing one of the largest published studies on blood flow following exercise as his most exciting project to date, Buckner found his passion in exploring the relationship between changes in muscle size and changes in muscle strength.

“The work we have done here is changing the way people think about skeletal muscle and how it adapts to resistance exercise,” said Buckner.

Loenneke also advised spring doctoral graduate Kevin Mattox of Pittsburgh, who is interviewing for assistant professor positions at a variety of institutions.

“I am both excited and sad to see these students graduate and move on with their careers,” Loenneke said. “All of them have done tremendous research here at the University of Mississippi, and it has been really special to work with each of them over the past three to four years. Their futures are bright.”

Martha Bass, associate professor and former graduate program coordinator, advised Williams’ research examining changes in bat swing kinematics in different areas of the strike zone among collegiate baseball and softball players. She also directed Wilson’s dissertation, where he found his true research interest.

“Our lab’s findings in this dissertation included novel aspects of possible roles of the neuromuscular system in the slip recovery process,” said Wilson, who plans to expand this research, examining older adults and special populations in his new role at Georgia Southern. “We hope we can translate these findings into effective ways of mitigating fall-related injuries and mortality.”

Minsoo Kang, chair of the Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management, congratulates Xi Jin at the 2018 Commencement exercises for the UM School of Applied Sciences. Jin will begin her second doctoral program in nutrition and hospitality management this fall. UM photo by Sarah Sapp

Xi Jin of Harbin, China, also a May graduate, will expand her research base by pursuing a second doctoral degree in nutrition and hospitality management in the UM School of Applied Sciences while assisting Teresa Carithers, interim dean, with the new undergraduate applied gerontology program.

Each of the graduates pointed to the outstanding professional and academic values of their fellow graduate student cohort, indicating the quality of their experience directly related to the academic profile and camaraderie of this particular group.

Davis, who is conducting studies focusing on substance use behavior and its association with mental health concerns since starting his career at the University of Arkansas, explained that it wasn’t only the talented faculty mentors, such as Bass, who helped pave his way to success.

“I am immensely thankful to have studied with the group of grad students,” Davis said. “I was fortunate enough to come through the HESRM department at a time of immense progress concerning scientific exploration and rigor.

“The quality of students who came through the program with me should be admired. These are some of the finest minds that I have had the pleasure of encountering. As great as the faculty I studied under are, I can say that I would not be the scientist I am without the advice, challenge and leadership exhibited in these friends.”

This progress in scientific exploration is exhibited not only in the success of this graduating doctoral class, but in the sheer number of peer-reviewed publications produced by the department. Faculty, with the help of these doctoral students, published 134 unique publications in 2017.

On average, faculty members in the field publish 3.6 peer-reviewed papers a year, said Minsoo Kang, HESRM chair, citing data from the 2015 National Academy of Kinesiology Doctoral Program Review. The Ole Miss department’s score of 9.57 publications is much higher than the national average.

“Considering that the top 25 percent of doctoral programs published only 5.52 publications per faculty per year, we just had a remarkable year in 2017,” Kang said. “We could potentially be ranked No. 1 in the nation in the number of publications category.”

The department’s research productivity exemplifies the teacher-scholar model, preparing students to lead their own research teams in an R1 environment, Carithers said.

For more information about the UM Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management, visit http://hesrm.olemiss.edu/.

UM Introduces Online Graduate Program in Educational Leadership

New curriculum designed for working K-12 teachers

Dennis Bunch coordinates the UM educational leadership program, which has the state’s highest first-time pass rate on the School Leaders Licensure Assessment. Photo by Kevin Bain/Ole Miss Communications

OXFORD, Miss. – The University of Mississippi School of Education is offering a new online graduate program in K-12 educational leadership to offer working teachers throughout Mississippi an opportunity to advance their careers in school leadership.

The online, 18-month program provides teachers a chance to earn either a Master of Education or Specialist in Education degree and will feature a rolling admissions policy, allowing new graduate students to begin their course of study in the fall, spring or summer.

“Ideal candidates would include those teachers with at least three years of classroom experience and the desire to improve education in the state of Mississippi,” said Dennis Bunch, associate professor and coordinator of the program. “The flexibility of the program will allow candidates previously unable to fit the program in to their schedule to enter the program and progress at their pace.”

The school plans to admit 20 new teachers in the program each semester.

“Future K-12 administrators in our state deserve training from highly qualified and experienced educational leaders and professors,” said John Crutchfield, UM assistant professor of educational leadership. “They should also have the chance to network and collaborate with highly impactful peers while completing their degree.

“What we are now doing is adding the ability to access these professors and networks online, regardless of where you live in the state of Mississippi.”

Teachers who graduate from the program and pass the School Leaders Licensure Assessment exam will qualify to apply for an advanced school administrator’s license from the Mississippi Department of Education.

More than 80 percent of graduates from UM’s educational leadership program pass the SLLA exam on the first try, and 98 percent of accepted graduate students finish the program, according to UM data.

The university is keeping its established, face-to-face option in K-12 leadership; however, the expansion into the online market will allow teachers from all corners of the state – and beyond – to enroll in the graduate program.

The 30-credit program is designed to be completed in 18 months. Applicants must hold a current teaching license, have three years of full-time teaching experience and have two letters of recommendation.

Students are required to complete at least two courses per semester throughout the program.

Many Ole Miss educational leadership graduates go directly in to principal or assistant principal positions after graduation. The program places a high priority on accepting teachers who have demonstrated leadership potential and the support of their school administration.

“We want to help the best teachers make that transition into becoming strong school leaders,” said Ryan Niemeyer, chair of the UM Department of Leadership and Counselor Education “Schools play a vital role in the economic development of our state.

“With that in mind, we are developing a program that will help future school leaders make positive changes in their schools no matter where they are.”

For more information about the program, visit http://rebelteacher.com/.