Search Results for: um museum 75 for 75

UM Museum 75 for 75: Andy Warhol’s ‘Oyster Stew’

Andy Warhol's screen print "Oyster Stew"

Andy Warhol’s screen print ‘Oyster Stew’

In honor of the University of Mississippi Museum‘s 75th anniversary, the Ole Miss News Blog is featuring 75 different items from the museum’s archives of more than 20,000 objects.

Today’s featured item is the Andy Warhol screen print “Oyster Stew,” which Warhol did on paper as part of his series of Campbell’s soup can paintings in the late 1960s. Warhol is one of the most famous “pop” artists. His paintings of soup can labels, Brillo pad boxes, Coca Cola bottles and other products are regarded as iconic works of American art.

“Oyster Stew” is part of the museum’s Forrest and Joan Stevens Collection.

As part of the museum’s anniversary celebration, admission is free through Aug. 8. There will be a lot to see as the museum introduces several new exhibits and unveils a new major gift, as well as the reinstallation of the David M. Robinson Collection of Greek and Roman antiquities.

For a complete list of upcoming events and information on the new exhibitions, click here.

The University Museum is open to the public 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The museum is closed Mondays and regular university holidays. Its facilities are handicapped-accessible. For assistance related to a disability, call 662-915-7084.

UM Museum 75 for 75: Ancient Griffin Coin

This ancient Greek coin, minted sometime between 450 and 430 B.C., is currently housed in the University of Mississippi Museum.

This ancient Greek coin, minted sometime between 450 and 430 B.C., is currently housed in the University of Mississippi Museum.

In honor of the University of Mississippi Museum‘s 75th anniversary, the Ole Miss News Blog is featuring 75 different items from the museum’s archives of more than 20,000 objects.

Today’s featured item is an ancient Greek coin, which depicts a griffin. The mythical creature is seated with one paw raised, with a small rooster below. The coin was minted sometime between 450 and 430 B.C. in the ancient Greek city of Abdera. Abdera was located on the Thrace coast.

The silver coin, which was a gift to the museum from Mr. and Mrs. Fran S. Peddle Jr., is a tetradrachm, which means it’s worth four drachmae.

As part of the museum’s anniversary celebration, admission is free through Aug. 8. There will be a lot to see as the museum introduces several new exhibits and unveils a new major giftas well as the reinstallation of the David M. Robinson Collection of Greek and Roman antiquities.

For a complete list of upcoming events and information on the new exhibitions, click here.

The University Museum is open to the public 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The museum is closed Mondays and regular university holidays. Its facilities are handicapped-accessible. For assistance related to a disability, call 662-915-7084.

UM Museum 75 for 75: Theora Hamblett’s Fluted Bowl

78_11_462 TH fluted glass bowl (1)

In honor of the University of Mississippi Museum‘s 75th anniversary this year, the Ole Miss News Blog is featuring 75 different items from the museum’s archives of more than 20,000 objects.

Today’s featured item is Theora Hamblett’s aquamarine colored fluted dish, which is painted between two pieces of glass. Hamblett donated the piece to the University Museum.

Born in Paris, Mississippi, in 1895, Hamblett took up painting later in life. The museum’s website contains an interesting biography of the artist’s extraordinary life:

She grew up on a chicken farm, which became the subject of many of her paintings. During the early decades of the twentieth century she taught school, but by the 1930s she left teaching to take care of her ill mother. After the passing of her mother, Theora Hamblett moved to Oxford where she bought a 12-room house, where she rented rooms to college students and sewed to make money. In 1948, the University of Mississippi created the Department of Art. Soon after, at the age of 55, Theora Hamblett took a class in oil painting, which provided her with the skills to create a prodigious amount of art for the rest of her life. In addition to a few classes at the University of Mississippi, she took correspondence art courses from the Famous Artists School. In 1954, a New York gallery owner, Betty Parsons purchased one of her paintings that found its way into the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art.

Many of Theora Hamblett’s works concentrated on her childhood memories, especially of the chicken farm in Paris. In nearly all of her landscape paintings, she includes animals or people; because she believed those additions gave life to the paintings. She also painted many landscapes that featured children playing games. After an accident that broke her hip and required surgery in 1954, she began to paint her dreams and visions. Many of her visions showed religious scenes that she often painted in series to tell a story. She also painted a large number of biblical scenes. She sold very few of these paintings, as they were deeply personal and she believed a testament of her faith.

As part of the museum’s anniversary celebration, admission is free through Aug. 8, 2015. There will be a lot to see as the museum introduces several new exhibits and unveils a new major gift as well as the reinstallation of the David M. Robinson Collection of Greek and Roman antiquities.

To see a complete list of upcoming events and information on the new exhibitions, click here.

The University Museum is open to the public 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The museum is closed Mondays and regular university holidays. Its facilities are handicapped-accessible. For assistance related to a disability, call 662-915-7084.

UM Museum 75 for 75: 1800s Tinted Mesh Goggles

This pair of late 1800s tinted mesh goggles are on display at the University Museum.

This pair of late 1800s tinted mesh goggles are on display at the University Museum.

In honor of the University of Mississippi Museum‘s 75th anniversary this year, the Ole Miss News Blog is featuring 75 different items from the museum’s archives of more than 20,000 objects.

Today’s featured item is a pair of tinted goggles with wire mesh that date back to the late 1800s. The goggles have blue lenses and two straps that tie in the back.

In the 1800s, wire mesh “cinder” goggles were used in early railroad carriages, which didn’t have windows. Cinders and dust blew into passenger compartments, and passengers used goggles to keep dust out of their eyes. Wire mesh cinder goggles were also worn by Civil War artillery soldiers, who needed to keep smoke and sparks from their eyes when they fired cannons.

The well-preserved goggles are a gift from Major Mildred Ferguson.

As part of the museum’s anniversary celebration, admission is free through Aug. 8, 2015. There will be a lot to see as the museum introduces several new exhibits and unveils a new major gift as well as the reinstallation of the David M. Robinson Collection of Greek and Roman antiquities.

To see a complete list of upcoming events and information on the new exhibitions, click here.

The University Museum is open to the public 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The museum is closed Mondays and regular university holidays. Its facilities are handicapped-accessible. For assistance related to a disability, call 662-915-7084.

UM Museum 75 for 75: Theora Hamblett’s ‘Creator’s Star and Trinity’

Theora HamblettIn honor of the University of Mississippi Museum‘s 75th anniversary this year, the Ole Miss News Blog is featuring 75 different items from the museum’s archives of more than 20,000 objects.

Today’s featured item is Theora Hamblett‘s painting on glass titled “Creator’s Star and Trinity.” Hamblett donated the piece, which features a six-pointed start with 63 yellow rays radiating from a golden-red center, to the museum. The paint is between two layers of glass.

Born in Paris, Mississippi, in 1895, Hamblett took up painting later in life. The museum’s website contains an interesting biography of the artist’s extraordinary life:

She grew up on a chicken-farm, which became the subject of many of her paintings. During the early decades of the twentieth century she taught school, but by the 1930s she left teaching to take care of her ill mother. After the passing of her mother, Theora Hamblett moved to Oxford where she bought a 12-room house, where she rented rooms to college students and sewed to make money. In 1948, the University of Mississippi created the Department of Art. Soon after, at the age of 55, Theora Hamblett took a class in oil painting, which provided her with the skills to create a prodigious amount of art for the rest of her life. In addition to a few classes at the University of Mississippi, she took correspondence art courses from the Famous Artists School. In 1954, a New York gallery owner, Betty Parsons purchased one of her paintings that found its way into the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art.

Many of Theora Hamblett’s works concentrated on her childhood memories, especially of the chicken farm in Paris. In nearly all of her landscape paintings, she includes animals or people; because she believed those additions gave life to the paintings. She also painted many landscapes that featured children playing games. After an accident that broke her hip and required surgery in 1954, she began to paint her dreams and visions. Many of her visions showed religious scenes that she often painted in series to tell a story. She also painted a large number of biblical scenes. She sold very few of these paintings, as they were deeply personal and she believed a testament of her faith.

As part of the museum’s anniversary celebration, admission is free through Aug. 8, 2015. There will be a lot to see as the museum introduces several new exhibits and unveils a new major gift as well as the reinstallation of the David M. Robinson Collection of Greek and Roman antiquities.

To see a complete list of upcoming events and information on the new exhibitions, click here.

The University Museum is open to the public 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The museum is closed Mondays and regular university holidays. Its facilities are handicapped-accessible. For assistance related to a disability, call 662-915-7084.

UM Museum 75 for 75: University Greys Jacket

UniversityGreysIn honor of the University of Mississippi Museum’s 75th anniversary this year, the Ole Miss News Blog is featuring 75 different items from the museum’s archives of more than 20,000 objects.

Today’s featured item is a jacket worn by a member of the University Greys, a unit of the Confederate army that many students joined during the spring of 1861. That following fall, only four students signed up for classes, so the university closed and would not reopen until 1865.

The unit was led by William B. Lowry, a 19-year-old UM student. Other Ole Miss students joined the Lamar Rifles, which was based in Lafayette County, or they left to join units in their respective hometowns.

Many of the University Greys were involved in “Pickett’s Charge” in July 1863 at the Battle of Gettysburg. All members of the unit were killed, captured or wounded during the charge. The Greys were part of the 11th Mississippi Infantry, which saw only 53 of its 393 men escape Pickett’s Charge unscathed.

As part of the museum’s anniversary celebration, admission is free through Aug. 8, 2015. There will be a lot to see as the museum introduces several new exhibits and unveils a new major gift as well as the reinstallation of the David M. Robinson Collection of Greek and Roman antiquities. 

The first of the 75 items to be featured was the Volute Krater, an ancient Greek artifact. The second item was Georgia O’Keeffe’s “Lake George” abstraction. The third was “Aphrodite,” a large-grained island marble piece made by an unknown Greek artist, and the fourth was Sulton Rogers’ “Devil.” The previous item to be featured was the “Snaggletooth Jug.”

To see a complete list of upcoming events and information on the new exhibitions, click here.

The University Museum is open to the public 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The museum is closed Mondays and regular university holidays. Its facilities are handicapped-accessible. For assistance related to a disability, call 662-915-7084.

UM Museum 75 for 75: ‘Snaggletooth Jug’

Peppertown Pottery "Snaggletooth Jug"

Peppertown Pottery ‘Snaggletooth Jug’

In honor of the University of Mississippi Museum’s 75th anniversary this year, the Ole Miss News Blog is featuring 75 different items from the museum’s archives of more than 20,000 objects.

Today’s featured item is the museum’s Peppertown Pottery “Snaggletooth Jug,” which was made in 1995 and signed by the Rileys, who owned the pottery business in Itawamba County. Married couple Titus and Euple Riley made the highly collectible Peppertown Pottery pieces in the Peppertown Community, near the banks of the Tombigbee River, for more than 20 years. Euple Riley died in 2004 and Titus Riley died in 2006.

As part of the museum’s anniversary celebration, admission is free through Aug. 8, 2015. There will be a lot to see as the museum introduces several new exhibits and unveils a new major gift as well as the reinstallation of the David M. Robinson Collection of Greek and Roman antiquities. 

The first of the 75 items to be featured was the Volute Krater, an ancient Greek artifact. The second item was Georgia O’Keeffe’s “Lake George” abstraction. The third was “Aphrodite,” a large-grained island marble piece made by an unknown Greek artist, and the fourth was Sulton Rogers’ “Devil.”

To see a complete list of upcoming events and information on the new exhibitions, click here.

The University Museum is open to the public 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The museum is closed Mondays and regular university holidays. Its facilities are handicapped-accessible. For assistance related to a disability, call 662-915-7084.

UM Museum 75 for 75: Sulton Rogers’ ‘Devil’

Sulton Rodgers' devil wood carved figurine.

Sulton Rogers’ “Devil” wood carved figurine.

In honor of the University of Mississippi Museum’s 75th anniversary this year, the Ole Miss News Blog is featuring 75 different items from the museum’s archives of more than 20,000 objects.

Today, we feature Sulton Rogers’ “Devil” figurine, which is a carved wood piece made in 1989. Bill Ferris gave the piece to the museum.

Rogers was a folk artist from Mississippi who spent the majority of his life in Syracuse, New York. He moved back to Oxford in 1984 and lived here until he died in 2003. He started doing woodcarvings as a method to stay awake during the long hours he worked at a chemical plant in Syracuse. He said his art was inspired by what he saw in his dreams. Many of his pieces were grotesque looking humanoid figurines and ghostly creatures.

As part of the museum’s anniversary celebration, admission is free through Aug. 8, 2015. There will be a lot to see as the museum introduces several new exhibits and unveils a new major gift as well as the reinstallation of the David M. Robinson Collection of Greek and Roman antiquities. 

The first of the 75 items to be featured was the Volute Krater, an ancient Greek artifact. The second item was Georgia O’Keeffe’s “Lake George” abstraction. The third was “Aphrodite,” a large-grained island marble piece that was made by an unknown Greek artist.

To see a complete list of upcoming events and information on the new exhibitions, click here.

The University Museum is open to the public 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The museum is closed Mondays and regular university holidays. Its facilities are handicapped-accessible. For assistance related to a disability, call 662-915-7084.

UM Museum 75 for 75: Second Century Marble ‘Aphrodite’

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The University of Mississippi Museum has more than 20,000 objects in its collection, and in honor of the museum’s 75th anniversary this year, the Ole Miss News Blog is featuring 75 different items from its collections.

Today, we feature the museum’s “Aphrodite,” a large-grained island marble piece that was made by an unknown Greek artist. It’s the third museum artifact to be featured on the blog. The piece, which is part of the museum’s David M. Robinson Collection of Greek and Roman antiquities in the Mary Buie building, dates back to the second century A.D. Helen Tudor Robinson gave it to the museum.

The museum’s description of the piece says its “eyes and hair are ’melting’ style typically Praxitelean. The holes in the ear lobes are for earrings. The hair was created with a running drill. Likely early Antonine Dynasty.”

As part of the museum’s anniversary celebration, admission is free through Aug. 8, 2015. There will be a lot to see as the museum introduces several new exhibits and unveils a new major gift as well as the reinstallation of the David M. Robinson Collection of Greek and Roman antiquities. 

The first of the 75 items to be featured was the Volute Krater, an ancient Greek artifact. The second item was Georgia O’Keeffe’s “Lake George” abstraction. 

To see a complete list of upcoming events and information on the new exhibitions, click here.

The University Museum is open to the public 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The museum is closed Mondays and regular university holidays. Its facilities are handicapped-accessible. For assistance related to a disability, call 662-915-7084.

UM Museum 75 for 75: Georgia O’Keeffe’s ‘Lake George’ Abstraction

One of the famed American artist's early pieces found its way to Oxford through a literary friendship

Georgia O'Keeffe's Lake George abstraction is at the University of Mississippi Museum.

Georgia O’Keeffe’s ‘Lake George’ abstraction is part of the University Museum’s permanent collection.

The University of Mississippi Museum has more than 20,000 objects in its collection, and in honor of the museum’s 75th anniversary this year, the Ole Miss News Blog is featuring 75 different items from its collections.

Today, we feature the museum’s Georgia O’Keeffe abstraction of Lake George.

The piece, which was created in 1918, is an oil painting on a board and was given to the museum by Semour Lawrence. Lawrence was a publisher who introduced the country to many great new writers during his career, including Katherine Anne Porter, Kurt Vonnegut, Richard Brautigan, Richard Ford, Barry Hannah, Jim Harrison and Joseph Heller.

When Oxford resident writer Barry Hannah brought Lawrence to Oxford, he fell in love with the town and purchased a home near Rowan Oak. When Lawrence died in 1994, his collection of American art came to the museum. It includes the O’Keeffe painting, plus paintings by Marsden Hartley, Man Ray, Arthur Dove and many other important artists.

The museum’s description of the piece contains a nice biography of O’Keefe.

Raised on a Wisconsin farm, Georgia O’Keeffe showed early promise in painting. Her formal training in imitative realism at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Art Students League of New York proved unfulfilling, and became the catalyst for the development of her own style. Early charcoal drawings sent to a friend from Columbia University in 1916 were passed on to Alfred Stieglitz, photographer and owner of avant-garde 291 Gallery in New York. Stieglitz began corresponding with O’Keeffe and exhibited her work, later offering her financial support for a career in New York. After arriving in New York, she and Stieglitz fell in love and were married in 1924. After Stieglitz’s death in 1946, O’Keeffe moved to New Mexico and created another half-century of work. Perhaps, most notably, her closely focused, large-scale images of flowers. She secured wide acclaim and recognition for her work in her lifetime, and died at the age of 98.

As part of the museum’s anniversary celebration, admission is free through Aug. 8, 2015. There will be a lot to see as the museum introduces several new exhibits and unveils a new major gift as well as the reinstallation of the David M. Robinson Collection of Greek and Roman antiquities in the Mary Buie building.

The first of the 75 items to be featured was the Volute Krater, an ancient Greek artifact.

To see a complete list of upcoming events and information on the new exhibitions, click here.

The University Museum is open to the public 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The museum is closed Mondays and regular university holidays. Its facilities are handicapped-accessible. For assistance related to a disability, call 662-915-7084.