Local HR Professionals Excel in National Certification Exam

UM prep class aids north Mississippi companies and employees

OXFORD, Miss.­­­ – Human resource professionals in north Mississippi are increasing their knowledge and skills to help employers after participating in the Society of Human Resources Learning System professional development course offered at the University of Mississippi.

“Going through this course helped me to better understand my job and do it in the best way possible,” said Mallory House of Hernando.

House works with payroll, insurance, worker’s compensation and various other HR tasks for the DeSoto County Board of Supervisors’ office. She passed her SHRM Certified Professional Exam in June.

“I think the class not only prepared me to take the certification exam, but it also prepared me for the day-to-day issues and challenges that will come up in my work,” House said.

The SHRM exam prep course that House completed last spring is enrolling participants for the fall 2018 group that will be offered on Tuesday evenings, Sept. 11 through Dec. 11, on the Oxford campus.

Taught by local human resource manager Christopher Byrd, the course not only prepares human resource professionals to take the SHRM-Certified Professional or SHRM-Senior Certified Professional Exams, but it also helps participants strengthen their understanding of core behavior and competencies that will help increase productivity in the workplace.

“Pursuing a nationally recognized certification in HR is one of the best ways to show you care about your career, your employees and your organization,” Byrd said.

Dylan Wilmoth is an operations leader with Human Technologies Inc. in Oxford. He completed the course and passed his SHRM exam in the spring of 2017.

“Anyone who is managing people or working in the HR field needs this course,” Wilmoth said. “Participating in this program has given me the knowledge to bridge the gap between what employees want and what the employer needs.

“After earning this certification, I have the knowledge I need to be an advocate for employees while still helping my company meet its goals.”

The SHRM organization has been active in the human resources community for seven decades and has more than 285,000 members worldwide.

“There has been a great success rate for enrollees in the SHRM certification course offered at Ole Miss,” said Mary Leach, UM director of professional development and lifelong learning. “These short workshops and courses are ideal for those who want to gain current and relevant knowledge to impact their job immediately.”

The registration fee for the course is $1,099 for non-SHRM members and $999 for members. Special discounts are available for Ole Miss alumni. Many businesses and organizations are offering educational tuition benefits for employees interested in completing the prep course.

Admission to the university is not required for this noncredit course.

For more information and to register, visit http://www.outreach.olemiss.edu/SHRM or contact Griffin Stroupe at 662-915-3121.

Isom Fellowships Create Collaborations Across Campus

Eight faculty members participate in inaugural interdisciplinary program

OXFORD, Miss. – The Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies at the University of Mississippi has chosen eight faculty members for its inaugural two-year fellowship program.

The program is designed to support research projects conducted by faculty in the areas of gender and sexuality. The support includes grant-writing support, research assistance and the organizing of conferences or symposia.

“We believe this program will continue to grow and engage diverse faculty,” said Jaime Harker, Isom Center director. “We are so grateful the provost has assisted us in the implementation of this program, which will build a network across campus and serve as a catalyst to promote interdisciplinary work.”

Harker said she was overwhelmed by the initial support of the program and hopes to continue offering fellowships in the future. The fellowships are made possible through funding from the Office of the Provost.

“Research on many of the issues facing society today requires perspectives from multiple disciplines and varied expertise,” Provost Noel Wilkin said. “Interdisciplinary collaborations stand to develop more robust solutions and advance perspectives that will benefit society more broadly.

“This approach is critically important to advancing the academic excellence called for in the Flagship Forward strategic plan. I appreciate the leadership that Dr. Harker and the Isom Center are exerting to facilitate this important work.”

The program’s inaugural fellows are Alysia Steele, assistant professor of multiplatform journalism; Rhona Justice-Malloy, professor of theatre arts; Susan Allen, associate professor of political science; Peter Wood, instructional assistant professor of theatre arts; Catherine Kilgore, adjunct instructor of law; Johnoson Crutchfield, assistant professor of educational leadership; Amanda Winburn, assistant professor of counselor education; and Kenya Wolff, assistant professor of early childhood education.

Steele’s project involves having students record interviews with and photograph elderly women in Oxford for a documentary examining their lives in the Great Depression, civil rights movement and women’s liberation movement. Students will create multimedia pieces to improve their digital literacy through podcasts, videography, photography and print stories while archiving local history. She plans to begin the project in spring 2019.

Justice-Malloy plans to create a women’s playwright summer residency to support emerging artists. She also will develop classes on contemporary women playwrights, all of which will be in conjunction with a national movement to increase the number of plays created by women, called “50/50 by 2020.” The long-term goal is to create a theater festival producing selected plays developed in the summer residencies.

Allen is completing a book detailing the diverse experiences of women through civil conflict. The project will be framed within the literatures of both gender studies and political science, and she is developing further research regarding how armed conflict and economic sanctions influence the position of women in local economies, as well as the participation of women in the labor force.

“As more civilians have been caught in the crossfire or armed conflict, it is important that we study and understand how women – who have been traditionally excluded from the battlefield – are affected by the changing nature of conflict and its ever-expanding consequences,” Allen said.

Wood will focus on avant-garde female artists, including symbolist playwrights and futurist and surrealist artists, as well as performance artists in the 1970s and ’80s. While the focus is on theater and live performance, this research also will explore women working in multiple genres, including painting, sculpture, poetry and cinema. The goal is to enhance instruction through new courses and possible art exhibits and film series at Ole Miss.

“I’ve always been fascinated with avant-garde and experimental theater forms and the more I study them, the more I realized that many of the women involved have been marginalized in the histories of these movements,” Wood said.

He hopes to bring the stories of those women back into the conversation.

“The work that many feminist performance artists created between the 1960s and 1980s has had a profound impact on solo performance and experimental theaters but is often relegated to a side conversation rather than being examined as foundational to contemporary forms of performance art. This work is meant to demonstrate just how important these women performance artists were and, in many cases, still are.”

Kilgore is interested in the history of women in the development of legal aid and civil rights lawsuits in Mississippi. She is exploring the possibility of developing an undergraduate pre-law course on women and the law.

Crutchfield will examine teacher perceptions of gender’s influence on leadership effectiveness by surveying teachers. He will use the results to create a professional development seminar addressing gender bias.

Winburn will study the role of school counselors, particularly in vulnerable and at-risk populations in Mississippi. She plans to conduct case studies of schools and investigations of teacher attitudes while also analyzing the distress students suffer from lack of advocacy.

“I am interested in better understanding how advocacy on behalf of the school counselor impacts student outcomes,” Winburn said.

This research should provide an understanding of barriers that school counselors face and allow them to develop advocacy competencies to better serve students, she said.

“I believe this line of research aligns with gender studies as we continue to fully evaluate and build a more equitable and accepting K-12 learning environment,” she said. “Educators who increase their own self-awareness and better understand their ability and competencies toward advocacy will more fully align and operate within a social justice perspective.”

Wolff plans to investigate the role of gender and identify formation in early childhood education as the notions of gender continue to evolve. She also will examine approaches for working with pre-service teachers to increase their knowledge base surrounding issues of gender and anti-bias curriculum.

These participants will join Carrie Smith, instructional associate professor of psychology, who was named an Isom Fellow earlier. She is working on the problem of sexual assault and teaching an introductory gender theory course this fall.

“All of these projects are exciting, innovative and will invigorate our curriculum and our research focus,” Harker said. “They also meet the larger goals of the Flagship Forward strategic plan by enhancing the quality of academic programs, supporting faculty excellence, increasing research and creative achievement, increasing entrepreneurship, and fostering an intellectual and engaged community.”

The participants will contribute to the center through research topics, teaching and service. Each fellow is to develop a new cross-listed class with the gender studies program.

“Although the Isom Center is within the College of Liberal Arts, our mission is much broader than that,” Harker said. “These projects show what you can do practically with what is learned, and these partnerships show why the lens of gender can illuminate things you wouldn’t see otherwise.”

Any faculty interested in collaborating with the Isom Center through gender and sexuality research is encouraged to contact Harker at jlharker@olemiss.edu. For more information about the center and its programs, visit https://sarahisomcenter.org.

University Launches Flagship Society

Campuswide giving program to benefit academics

The Flagship Society is the first campus-wide leadership annual giving program at the University of Mississippi. Individuals can join this fiscal year and become charter members, providing crucial private support to our academic community. Photo by Kirsten Faulkner

OXFORD, Miss. – The University of Mississippi has launched the Flagship Society – its first campuswide leadership annual giving program – to recognize annual donors, share the impact of their giving and increase philanthropic support for academic programs and scholarships at a time when higher education costs are escalating.

“The Flagship Society will add to the margin of excellence at Ole Miss, advancing the university’s ability to transform lives and make a profound impact in Mississippi, the nation and the world,” said Charlotte Parks, UM vice chancellor for development. “We thank all the dedicated Ole Miss faculty and staff who work hard every day for our students and the university and also hope they will consider joining the Flagship Society.”

For the seventh consecutive fiscal year, which ended June 30, Ole Miss alumni, friends, students, faculty and staff have committed in excess of $100 million in private support, much-needed resources as state support covers only 13 percent of the university’s annual budget.

Chancellor Jeffrey Vitter said he is constantly inspired by donors’ desire to give back to ensure future generations have exceptional educational opportunities and society has a higher quality of life.

“Through their giving, Flagship Society members will be expressing a strong belief in the power of higher education and the positive impact of private support,” he said. “Our alumni and friends are known far and wide for their continuous and generous investments in the Ole Miss student experience, our academic environment and outreach efforts.

“The University of Mississippi is honored to recognize these annual donors who step up, year after year, to propel the flagship forward.”

The Flagship Society name pays homage to the university’s flagship status as the oldest and largest public university in Mississippi. The name also represents members of the Ole Miss family who serve as philanthropic leaders in the academic, service and cultural programs, Parks said.

“We want to honor the Flagship Society members’ generosity by selecting a name that reflects their impact on the university,” she said. “Each Flagship Society gift combines with others to produce powerful resources.”

Annual gifts can, for example, bolster scholarship support for students, increase funds for the recruitment and retention of faculty, increase graduate stipends to support doctoral students, heighten access to research grants whose results help people live healthier lives, increase maintenance funds to keep up the university’s array of facilities and beautiful campus, and increase support for the cultural arts.

Having these resources enables university leadership to be flexible and prompt in addressing needs and opportunities without diverting resources from elsewhere, said Alyssa Vinluan, an annual gifts officer in the UM Office of University Development.

Membership in the Flagship Society is open to anyone or household that gives at least $1,000 to academics during the fiscal year (July 1-June 30). Donors can make unrestricted gifts to the Ole Miss Fund – resources used at the discretion of UM leadership for the university’s greatest needs – or donors can choose to direct their gifts to a specific school, program or scholarship, Vinluan said.

Membership can also be met by pledging a commitment of $1,000 or more, beginning at $84 a month, or for university employees, approximately $42 a pay period. Membership is renewable each fiscal year.

Flagship Society members will be recognized in several ways and will receive an exclusive Flagship Society car decal and invitations to special events. Donors who join in the Flagship Society’s inaugural year, July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019, will be identified as charter members.

With the support of alumni, friends, university leaders, faculty and staff, the Flagship Society stands to influence many areas of our campus for years to come.

“The Flagship Society can help elevate the value of all University of Mississippi degrees; organizations such as U.S. News and World Report factor alumni giving participation into their rankings of the best universities in America,” Parks said. “We deeply appreciate each and every gift that fuels our reach for even greater heights of excellence.”

Gifts can be made by sending a check in support of academics to the University of Mississippi Foundation, 406 University Ave., Oxford, MS 38655; or by visiting http://www.umfoundation.com/flagshipsociety. For more information, contact Alyssa Vinluan, annual giving officer, at alyssa@olemiss.edu or 662-915-1311.

Foodways Studies Come of Age as a Respected Discipline

Work at UM Center for the Study of Southern Culture includes conferences, books and films

Ava Lowrey’s film ‘Johnny’s Greek and Three,’ looks at Chef Tim Hontzas and the role of Greek-Southern families in shaping Birmingham, Alabama, dining. Submitted photo

OXFORD, Miss. – In the conclusion of “The Larder: Food Studies Methods from the American South,” co-editor Ted Ownby writes that it seems likely it will be the last collection of food studies scholarship that must justify the field of study.

John T. Edge, director of the Southern Foodways Alliance at the University of Mississippi, agrees with that assessment.

“I think foodways studies has reached a point of maturation,” Edge said. “There’s a broadening of the field of food studies, which was, at first, often primarily concerned with food system problems.

“Contemporary foodways scholarship defines food as a product of various interwoven cultural processes. The question we’re asking today is, ‘What direction will those linked fields take?’ For the SFA, our investment in those fields has grown more multifaceted each year.”

The hiring of Catarina Passidomo in 2014 as the first UM faculty member specifically teaching foodways classes is part of that investment. 

“Studying foodways offers insight into everyday life, ritual, social interactions and other cultural phenomena,” Passidomo wrote in the syllabus for her class, SST 555: The South in Food. “By studying food – and eating and agriculture – as systems, we can also gain insight into broader patterns of power, identity formation and maintenance, and the meaning and importance of particular places.

“By placing the study of foodways within the context of ‘the South,’ we can better understand – and, perhaps, complicate – what, if anything, makes that place unique.

Another place to see what is happening in the field of foodways is the SFA Graduate Student Conference, which takes place for the fifth year this fall. The conference is one of the most eagerly anticipated dates on the SFA calendar, Edge said.

“It’s a great example of the ways in which we contribute to the careers to these young scholars and also benefit from their presence in our midst,” he said. “A range of senior scholars who have come to speak at that event, people like Krishnendu Ray from NYU and Bart Elmore, now at the Ohio State University, have proven generous thinkers and mentors who see the same promise in the field and see the same promise in these young academics, many of whom are exploring identity through food culture.” 

At the 2017 conference, which focused on foodways and social justice and was co-hosted by the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Bobby J. Smith II, a PhD candidate in the Department of Development Sociology at Cornell University, presented a paper on “Disrupting Food Access: The White Citizens’ Council and the Politics of Food in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement.”

Smith spoke of food as a weapon, studying the food blockades during the civil rights movement and the ways that the White Citizens’ Council withheld food from black citizens of the Delta. After the conference, the SFA published an excerpt from that paper in Gravy, its quarterly journal.

Ava Lowrey, the Pihakis Foodways Documentary Filmmaker, uses film to share untold food stories centered in the South. In 2017, she produced films on a Greek restaurateur in Birmingham and on the fish camps of the Carolinas, which long served families who worked the region’s cotton mills.

Last spring she taught a Food and Film course, and this spring taught an advanced documentary production course, in addition to working with emerging filmmakers as interns and workshop attendees.

“The teaching parts of my job are the parts that I feel the most overwhelming pride in,” Lowrey said. “I love seeing the projects the students come up with and the discussions that we have in classes.” 

The SFA also curates a scholarly book series, the Southern Foodways Alliance Studies in Culture, People, and Place, published by the University of Georgia press.

For the series, SFA will publish two books this year, including “Catfish Dream: Ed Scott’s Fight for his Family Farm and Racial Justice in the Mississippi Delta,” by Julian Rankin, who wrote that book, in part, book at a Rivendell Writers Workshop fellowship that the SFA funded. Edge, Sara Camp Milam, and Brett Anderson, who serves on the editorial board for the series, all worked with Rankin to develop and polish the manuscript.

“Catfish Dream” is the story of Ed Scott, the first African-American catfish farmer. His life story, framed by Rankin, showcases the vitality of the field and its dynamic relationship to Southern studies. This book makes clear, too, how SFA’s long-term investments in young scholars is paying dividends.

One of the Southern studies graduates who influenced the field of foodways is Georgeanna Milam Chapman, who wrote her master’s thesis about food journalist Craig Claiborne.

“The discovery and research that she did on Claiborne’s life led to a broader understanding of his life and work,” Edge said. “She framed him in a new way as a Southerner, rebelling against the social strictures of the Delta.”

During a session on foodways at the 2018 Oxford Conference for the Book in March, Edge, author of “The Potlikker Papers,” and Jonathan Kauffman, author of “Hippie Food: How Back-to-the-Landers, Longhairs, and Revolutionaries Changed the Way We Eat,” discussed their works. 

“Kauffman’s book is another example of dynamic scholarship that reappraises a moment in American history often overlooked,” Edge said “He frames the so-called hippie food movement as a radical rethinking of the food supply and makes clear how and why so-called hippie food has gone mainstream.”

Through teaching, studying, writing, publishing, sharing and storytelling, the field of food studies fits in seamlessly with Southern studies and its interdisciplinary approach.

This summer, the SFA turned an eye to the food and literature citadel of Lexington, Kentucky. On June 21-23, the Summer Symposium explored the diverse city at the heart of the bluegrass region and on the cusp of Appalachia.

Through lectures, oral history presentations, documentary films, tastings and experiences, the SFA framed Kentucky in the regional food conversation, continuing to tell stories about the South by giving voice to farmers, cooks and writers.

Meet Camille Toles, June’s Staff Member of the Month

Camille Toles

Camille Toles, administrative coordinator for the Office of Institutional Research, Effectiveness and Planning, has been selected as Staff Council’s Staff Member of the Month for June. To help us get to know her better, Toles answered a few questions for Inside Ole Miss.

IOM: How long have you worked at Ole Miss?

Toles: Almost three years.

IOM: What is your hometown?

Toles: Oxford. I was born and raised in Taylor, but Oxford has always been home.

IOM: Talk about your favorite Ole Miss memory.

Toles: The day I got an opportunity to be a part of this community. Ole Miss has so much to offer and so many possibilities.

IOM: What do you enjoy most about your position or the department in which you work?

Toles: What I enjoy most are the people whom I interact with daily, being staff, faculty, grads and undergrads. I also enjoy the relief on one’s face when they have reached a solution to an issue that I was able to help resolve.

IOM: What do you like to do when you are not at work?

Toles: I like to follow my kids to their sports events and activities, sing and just relax outside when I can.

IOM: What is one thing on your bucket list?

Toles: To be able to see the many places I want to visit. It’s a lot. Travel is what I want to do.

IOM: What is your favorite movie?

Toles: Oh my, there are so many. I love all Marvel movies. I remember as a child I use to watch “The Wiz” every day. That’s an all-time favorite. It stars Michael Jackson and Diana Ross.

IOM: What is your favorite Ole Miss tradition?

Toles: Ole Miss football tailgating – a beautiful sight to see. People enjoying each people.

IOM: What is a fun fact about you? 

Toles: I’m a basketball, volleyball, powerlifting, softball, baseball, cheerleading and football mom. 

IOM: If you could have lunch with anyone alive or dead/fictional or real, who would it be and why?

Toles: Michelle Obama! Just because we have the same birthday. I think she is awesome, smart, beautiful and a great person.

IOM: What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Toles: Loyal, fair and kindhearted. But never a pushover.

IOM: If you could visit one time or place in world history, what would it be?

Toles: The past is the past! I would love to see the future and see the first female president of color.

IOM: If I could be an animal for a day, I would be an ____ .

Toles: An eagle. 

To nominate a colleague for Staff Member of the Month, email staffcouncil@olemiss.edu with the name of the individual you’d like to nominate as well as why you feel he or she should be recognized.

Four UM Students from Brandon to Intern in Asia this Summer

Students are part of new program funded by Freeman Foundation

OXFORD, Miss. – Sarah Berry, Stewart Eaton, Mo Karzon and Jasmine Nguyen, all of Brandon, are four of the 17 University of Mississippi students who will be interning in East and Southeast Asia this summer, thanks to a substantial grant from the Freeman Foundation of Stowe, Vermont.

Berry is a sophomore in the UM School of Engineering, where her major is general engineering with a pre-medicine emphasis. She has an internship with Shanghai First People’s Hospital in Shanghai.

Eaton is a junior in the UM School of Engineering, where his major is chemical engineering. He has an internship with Energaia in Bangkok.

Karzon is a junior in the UM School of Business Administration, where his major is managerial finance, and he has a second major in economics. He has an internship with Piggipo, which is also in Bangkok.

Nguyen is a sophomore in the UM College of Liberal Arts, where her major is international studies, and she has a second major in history. She has an internship with Motivo in Toyko.

They are among the inaugural members of the UM Experiential Learning in East Asia program at the university.

This $100,000 program allows selected undergraduates to complete a summer internship of at least eight weeks in summer 2018. Each will receive $5,000 from the Freeman Foundation grant and an additional $2,500 provided by the university’s Office of Global Engagement and the students’ respective Ole Miss schools.

The goal of the Freeman Foundation’s grant is to help students gain real-life experience while interacting regularly with local populations. Established in 1994 by the estate of AIG co-founder Mansfield Freeman, the foundation’s general mission is “to strengthen the bonds of friendship between this country and those of the Far East” and “to stimulate an exchange of ideas in economic and cultural fields which will help create mutual understanding.”

Headed by Mansfield Freeman’s grandson, Graeme Freeman, the foundation donates approximately $50 million annually to programs such as study abroad scholarships for Asian and American students and the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia, which has supported the efforts of the UM Croft Institute for International Studies to strengthen teaching about East Asia for more than 15 years.

This grant lets the Croft Institute and other participating campus units deliver on the university’s commitment to educate and engage global citizens and to support experiential learning, two core principles in the university’s Flagship Forward strategic plan. Students chosen for UM Experiential Learning in East Asia will learn how a foreign culture affects the work environment and help prepare them to succeed.

The goal is to make the UM Experiential Learning in Eastern Asia program a permanent feature at the university.

For more information about UM Experiential Learning in Eastern Asia, visit http://www.croft.olemiss.edu/home/freeman-internships-in-east-asia. A more detailed news release about the program can be found here https://news.olemiss.edu/um-students-intern-summer-eastern-asia/.

Three UM Students from Oxford to Intern in Asia this Summer

Meredith Brown, Emma Scott, Daria Herasymova are part of new program funded by Freeman Foundation

OXFORD, Miss. – Meredith Brown and Emma Scott, both of Oxford, and Daria Herasymova, an exchange student from Ukraine who attended Oxford High School, are three of 17 University of Mississippi students who will be interning in East and Southeast Asia this summer, thanks to a substantial grant from the Freeman Foundation of Stowe, Vermont.

Brown is a junior in the UM Patterson School of Accounting, where her major is accountancy, and she has a second major in Chinese. She has an internship with FedEx in Shanghai.

Scott is a freshman in the UM College of Liberal Arts, where she majors in international studies. She has an internship with K Star Live in Seoul, South Korea.

Herasymova is a junior in the UM School of Business, where her major is economics, and she has a second major in managerial finance. She has an internship with Evotech Capital in Shanghai.

Brown, Scott and Herasymova are among the inaugural members of the UM Experiential Learning in East Asia program at the university.

This $100,000 program allows selected undergraduates to complete a summer internship of at least eight weeks in summer 2018. Each will receive $5,000 from the Freeman Foundation grant and an additional $2,500 provided by the university’s Office of Global Engagement and the students’ respective Ole Miss schools.

The goal of the Freeman Foundation’s grant is to help students gain real-life experience while interacting regularly with local populations. Established in 1994 by the estate of AIG co-founder Mansfield Freeman, the foundation’s general mission is “to strengthen the bonds of friendship between this country and those of the Far East” and “to stimulate an exchange of ideas in economic and cultural fields which will help create mutual understanding.”

Headed by Mansfield Freeman’s grandson, Graeme Freeman, the foundation donates approximately $50 million annually to programs such as study abroad scholarships for Asian and American students and the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia, which has supported the efforts of the UM Croft Institute for International Studies to strengthen teaching about East Asia for more than 15 years.

This grant lets the Croft Institute and other participating campus units deliver on the university’s commitment to educate and engage global citizens and to support experiential learning, two core principles in the university’s Flagship Forward strategic plan. Students chosen for UM Experiential Learning in East Asia will learn how a foreign culture affects the work environment and help prepare them to succeed.

The goal is to make the UM Experiential Learning in Eastern Asia program a permanent feature at the university.

For more information about UM Experiential Learning in Eastern Asia, visit http://www.croft.olemiss.edu/home/freeman-internships-in-east-asia. A more detailed news release about the program can be found here https://news.olemiss.edu/um-students-intern-summer-eastern-asia/.

Bush to Intern in China this Summer

Student from Gulfport part of new UM program funded by Freeman Foundation

OXFORD, Miss. – Sydney Bush, of Gulfport, is one of 17 University of Mississippi students who will be interning in East and Southeast Asia this summer, thanks to a substantial grant from the Freeman Foundation of Stowe, Vermont.

Bush is a senior in the UM School of Business Administration, where her major is economics, and she has a minor in environmental studies. She has an internship with New Energy Nexus in Shanghai. She is among the inaugural members of the UM Experiential Learning in East Asia program at the university.

This $100,000 program allows selected undergraduates to complete a summer internship of at least eight weeks in summer 2018. Each will receive $5,000 from the Freeman Foundation grant and an additional $2,500 provided by the university’s Office of Global Engagement and the students’ respective Ole Miss schools.

The goal of the Freeman Foundation’s grant is to help students gain real-life experience while interacting regularly with local populations. Established in 1994 by the estate of AIG co-founder Mansfield Freeman, the foundation’s general mission is “to strengthen the bonds of friendship between this country and those of the Far East” and “to stimulate an exchange of ideas in economic and cultural fields which will help create mutual understanding.”

Headed by Mansfield Freeman’s grandson, Graeme Freeman, the foundation donates approximately $50 million annually to programs such as study abroad scholarships for Asian and American students and the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia, which has supported the efforts of the UM Croft Institute for International Studies to strengthen teaching about East Asia for more than 15 years.

This grant lets the Croft Institute and other participating campus units deliver on the university’s commitment to educate and engage global citizens and to support experiential learning, two core principles in the university’s Flagship Forward strategic plan. Students chosen for UM Experiential Learning in East Asia will learn how a foreign culture affects the work environment and help prepare them to succeed.

The goal is to make the UM Experiential Learning in Eastern Asia program a permanent feature at the university.

For more information about UM Experiential Learning in Eastern Asia, visit http://www.croft.olemiss.edu/home/freeman-internships-in-east-asia. A more detailed news release about the program can be found here https://news.olemiss.edu/um-students-intern-summer-eastern-asia/.

Caple to Intern in China this Summer

Student from Huntsville part of new UM program funded by Freeman Foundation

OXFORD, Miss. – Tyler Caple, of Huntsville, Alabama, is one of 17 University of Mississippi students who will be interning in East and Southeast Asia this summer, thanks to a substantial grant from the Freeman Foundation of Stowe, Vermont.

Caple is a junior in the UM College of Liberal Arts, where her major is international studies, and she has a second major in Chinese. She has an internship with the Women in Leadership League in Shanghai. She is among the inaugural members of the UM Experiential Learning in East Asia program at the university.

This $100,000 program allows selected undergraduates to complete a summer internship of at least eight weeks in summer 2018. Each will receive $5,000 from the Freeman Foundation grant and an additional $2,500 provided by the university’s Office of Global Engagement and the students’ respective Ole Miss schools.

The goal of the Freeman Foundation’s grant is to help students gain real-life experience while interacting regularly with local populations. Established in 1994 by the estate of AIG co-founder Mansfield Freeman, the foundation’s general mission is “to strengthen the bonds of friendship between this country and those of the Far East” and “to stimulate an exchange of ideas in economic and cultural fields which will help create mutual understanding.”

Headed by Mansfield Freeman’s grandson, Graeme Freeman, the foundation donates approximately $50 million annually to programs such as study abroad scholarships for Asian and American students and the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia, which has supported the efforts of the UM Croft Institute for International Studies to strengthen teaching about East Asia for more than 15 years.

This grant lets the Croft Institute and other participating campus units deliver on the university’s commitment to educate and engage global citizens and to support experiential learning, two core principles in the university’s Flagship Forward strategic plan. Students chosen for UM Experiential Learning in East Asia will learn how a foreign culture affects the work environment and help prepare them to succeed.

The goal is to make the UM Experiential Learning in Eastern Asia program a permanent feature at the university.

For more information about UM Experiential Learning in Eastern Asia, visit http://www.croft.olemiss.edu/home/freeman-internships-in-east-asia. A more detailed news release about the program can be found at https://news.olemiss.edu/um-students-intern-summer-eastern-asia/.

De la Cruz to Intern in South Korea this Summer

Student from Southaven part of new UM program funded by Freeman Foundation

OXFORD, Miss. Lucy De la Cruz, of Southaven, is one of 17 University of Mississippi students who will be interning in East and Southeast Asia this summer, thanks to a substantial grant from the Freeman Foundation of Stowe, Vermont.

De la Cruz is a sophomore in the UM College of Liberal Arts, where her major is biology with a pre-medicine emphasis. She has an internship with Jaseng Hospital of Korean Medicine in Seoul, South Korea. She is among the inaugural members of the UM Experiential Learning in East Asia program at the university.

This $100,000 program allows selected undergraduates to complete a summer internship of at least eight weeks in summer 2018. Each will receive $5,000 from the Freeman Foundation grant and an additional $2,500 provided by the university’s Office of Global Engagement and the students’ respective Ole Miss schools.

The goal of the Freeman Foundation’s grant is to help students gain real-life experience while interacting regularly with local populations. Established in 1994 by the estate of AIG co-founder Mansfield Freeman, the foundation’s general mission is “to strengthen the bonds of friendship between this country and those of the Far East” and “to stimulate an exchange of ideas in economic and cultural fields which will help create mutual understanding.”

Headed by Mansfield Freeman’s grandson, Graeme Freeman, the foundation donates approximately $50 million annually to programs such as study abroad scholarships for Asian and American students and the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia, which has supported the efforts of the UM Croft Institute for International Studies to strengthen teaching about East Asia for more than 15 years.

This grant lets the Croft Institute and other participating campus units deliver on the university’s commitment to educate and engage global citizens and to support experiential learning, two core principles in the university’s Flagship Forward strategic plan. Students chosen for UM Experiential Learning in East Asia will learn how a foreign culture affects the work environment and help prepare them to succeed.

The goal is to make the UM Experiential Learning in Eastern Asia program a permanent feature at the university.

For more information about UM Experiential Learning in Eastern Asia, visit http://www.croft.olemiss.edu/home/freeman-internships-in-east-asia. A more detailed news release about the program can be found here https://news.olemiss.edu/um-students-intern-summer-eastern-asia/.